What does it take to become 'best friends'? Evolutionary changes in canine social competence

Research output: Article

115 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The traditional and relatively narrow-focused research on ape-human comparisons has recently been significantly extended by investigations of different clades of animals, including the domestic dog (Canis familiaris). Here, we provide a short overview of how the comparative investigation of canine social behaviour advances our understanding of the evolution of social skills and argue that a system-level approach to dog social cognition provides a broader view on the 'human-likeness' of canine social competence. We introduce the concept of evolutionary social competence as a collateral notion of developmental social competence. We argue that such an extended perspective on social competence provides a useful tool for conceptualising wolf-dog differences in socio-cognitive functioning, as well as for considering specific social skills not in isolation, but as a part of a system.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)287-294
Number of pages8
JournalTrends in Cognitive Sciences
Volume17
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - jún. 2013

Fingerprint

Canidae
Dogs
Social Behavior
Domestic Animals
Hominidae
Cognition
Social Skills
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

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