The homologue of het-c of Neurospora crassa lacks vegetative compatibility function in Fusarium proliferation

Z. Kerényi, Brigitta Oláh, Apor Jeney, L. Hornok, John F. Leslie

Research output: Article

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

For two fungal strains to be vegetatively compatible and capable of forming a stable vegetative heterokaryon they must carry matching alleles at a series of loci variously termed het or vic genes. Cloned het/vic genes from Neurospora crassa and Podospora anserina have no obvious functional similarity and have various cellular functions. Our objective was to identify the homologue of the Neurospora het-c gene in Fusarium proliferatum and to determine if this gene has a vegetative compatibility function in this economically important and widely dispersed fungal pathogen. In F. proliferatum and five other closely related Fusarium species we found a few differences in the DNA sequence, but the changes were silent and did not alter the amino acid sequence of the resulting protein. Deleting the gene altered sexual fertility as the female parent, but it did not alter male fertility or existing vegetative compatibility interactions. Replacement of the allele-specific portion of the coding sequence with the sequence of an alternate allele in N. crassa did not result in a vegetative incompatibility response in transformed strains of F. proliferatum. Thus, the fphch gene in Fusarium appears unlikely to have the vegetative compatibility function associated with its homologue in N. crassa. These results suggest that the vegetative compatibility phenotype may result from convergent evolution. Thus, the genes involved in this process may need to be identified at the species level or at the level of a group of species and could prove to be attractive targets for the development of antifungal agents.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)6527-6532
Number of pages6
JournalApplied and Environmental Microbiology
Volume72
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - okt. 2006

Fingerprint

Neurospora crassa
Fusarium
gene
Fusarium proliferatum
Genes
genes
allele
Alleles
alleles
Fertility
fertility
Podospora anserina
Podospora
Neurospora
heterokaryon
convergent evolution
Antifungal Agents
incompatibility
male fertility
phenotype

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Biotechnology
  • Microbiology

Cite this

The homologue of het-c of Neurospora crassa lacks vegetative compatibility function in Fusarium proliferation. / Kerényi, Z.; Oláh, Brigitta; Jeney, Apor; Hornok, L.; Leslie, John F.

In: Applied and Environmental Microbiology, Vol. 72, No. 10, 10.2006, p. 6527-6532.

Research output: Article

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