The antifungal protein AFP secreted by Aspergillus giganteus does not cause detrimental effects on certain mammalian cells

Research output: Article

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The antifungal protein AFP is a small, cystein-rich protein secreted by the imperfect ascomycete Aspergillus giganteus. The protein efficiently inhibits the growth of filamentous fungi, including a variety of serious human and plant pathogens mainly of the genera Aspergillus and Fusarium, whereas AFP does not affect the growth of yeast and bacteria. This restricted susceptibility range makes it very attractive for medical or biotechnological use to combat fungal infection and contamination. We, therefore, analyzed whether AFP affects the growth or function of a number of mammalian cells. Here we show that the protein neither provokes any cytotoxic effects on human endothelial cells isolated from the umbilical vein nor activates the immune system. Moreover, potassium currents of neurons and astrocytes do not change in the presence of AFP and neither excitatory processes nor the intracellular calcium homeostasis of cultured skeletal muscle myotubes are affected by AFP. Our data, therefore, suggest that AFP is indeed a promising candidate for the therapeutic or biotechnological use as a potential antifungal agent.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1717-1725
Number of pages9
JournalPeptides
Volume27
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - júl. 1 2006

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Physiology
  • Endocrinology
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

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