Role of salicylic acid in the induction of abiotic stress tolerance

Research output: Chapter

53 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Investigations on compounds capable of reducing the stress sensitivity of crops are of great importance from both the theoretical and the practical point of view. In terms of stress physiology, salicylic acid was first demonstrated to play a role in responses to biotic stress. However, it was gradually found to have more and more effects that could be of importance for other stress factors, and a great deal of evidence has accumulated in recent years suggesting that salicylic acid also plays a role in responses to abiotic stress effects (such as low and high temperature, UV-B irradiation, ozone, heavy metals, etc.). Most papers, on this subject, have reported on the protective effect of exogenous salicylic acid against abiotic stress. When applied in satisfactory concentrations salicylic acid may cause a temporary low level of oxidative stress in plants, which acts as a hardening process, improving the antioxidative capacity of the plants and helping to induce the synthesis of protective compounds such as polyamines. Numerous mutant or transgenic plants are now available in which the salicylic acid metabolism has been modified in some way. These allow us to obtain a more accurate picture of the endogenous effect and role of salicylic acid. Evidence now suggests the existence of a regulatory defence mechanism in which salicylic acid plays an important role, but which is not stress-specific, apparently functioning against many different stress factors. This chapter provides a review of the effects exerted by salicylic acid and related compounds in relation to abiotic stress tolerance.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationSalicylic Acid: A Plant Hormone
PublisherSpringer Netherlands
Pages91-150
Number of pages60
ISBN (Print)9781402051845, 1402051832, 9781402051838
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2007

Fingerprint

Salicylic Acid
salicylic acid
stress tolerance
abiotic stress
Ozone
Genetically Modified Plants
Polyamines
biotic stress
Heavy Metals
polyamines
defense mechanisms
ozone
protective effect
transgenic plants
heavy metals
Oxidative Stress
oxidative stress
physiology
irradiation
mutants

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Role of salicylic acid in the induction of abiotic stress tolerance. / Janda, T.; Horváth, E.; Szalai, G.; Páldi, E.

Salicylic Acid: A Plant Hormone. Springer Netherlands, 2007. p. 91-150.

Research output: Chapter

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