Roadmap and strategy for overcoming infusion reactions to nanomedicines

J. Szebeni, Dmitri Simberg, África González-Fernández, Yechezkel Barenholz, Marina A. Dobrovolskaia

Research output: Article

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Infusion reactions (IRs) are complex, immune-mediated side effects that mainly occur within minutes to hours of receiving a therapeutic dose of intravenously administered pharmaceutical products. These products are diverse and include both traditional pharmaceuticals (for example biological agents and small molecules) and new ones (for example nanotechnology-based products). Although IRs are not unique to nanomedicines, they represent a hurdle for the translation of nanotechnology-based drug products. This Perspective offers a big picture of the pharmaceutical field and examines current understanding of mechanisms responsible for IRs to nanomedicines. We outline outstanding questions, review currently available experimental evidence to provide some answers and highlight the gaps. We review advantages and limitations of the in vitro tests and animal models used for studying IRs to nanomedicines. Finally, we propose a roadmap to improve current understanding, and we recommend a strategy for overcoming the problem.

Original languageEnglish
JournalNature Nanotechnology
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - jan. 1 2018

Fingerprint

Medical nanotechnology
Drug products
Nanotechnology
products
nanotechnology
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Biological Factors
Antigen-Antibody Complex
animal models
Animals
drugs
Molecules
dosage
molecules

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Bioengineering
  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Materials Science(all)
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

Cite this

Szebeni, J., Simberg, D., González-Fernández, Á., Barenholz, Y., & Dobrovolskaia, M. A. (Accepted/In press). Roadmap and strategy for overcoming infusion reactions to nanomedicines. Nature Nanotechnology. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41565-018-0273-1

Roadmap and strategy for overcoming infusion reactions to nanomedicines. / Szebeni, J.; Simberg, Dmitri; González-Fernández, África; Barenholz, Yechezkel; Dobrovolskaia, Marina A.

In: Nature Nanotechnology, 01.01.2018.

Research output: Article

Szebeni, J. ; Simberg, Dmitri ; González-Fernández, África ; Barenholz, Yechezkel ; Dobrovolskaia, Marina A. / Roadmap and strategy for overcoming infusion reactions to nanomedicines. In: Nature Nanotechnology. 2018.
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