Rheumatoid arthritis and metabolic syndrome

G. Kerekes, Michael T. Nurmohamed, Miguel A. González-Gay, I. Seres, G. Paragh, Zsófia Kardos, Zsuzsa Baráth, László Tamási, P. Soltész, Z. Szekanecz

Research output: Article

55 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA), especially active disease, is associated with considerable changes in body composition, lipids, adipokines and insulin sensitivity. Metabolic changes, such as increased total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol and triglyceride levels, occur even in preclinical RA. Active RA is associated with decreased lipid levels, BMI, fat and muscle mass, as well as altered lipid profiles. Some of these changes are also seen in metabolic syndrome, and could increase cardiovascular mortality. Importantly, the systemic inflammation underlying RA is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. This Perspectives article summarizes data on the associations of various components of metabolic syndrome with RA, and discusses the effects of biologic therapy on these factors. The authors propose that components of metabolic syndrome should be monitored in patients with RA throughout the disease course, and argue that optimal disease control using biologic agents might attenuate several adverse effects of metabolic syndrome in these patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)691-696
Number of pages6
JournalNature Reviews Rheumatology
Volume10
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - nov. 5 2014

Fingerprint

Rheumatoid Arthritis
Lipids
Biological Therapy
Adipokines
Biological Factors
Body Composition
LDL Cholesterol
Insulin Resistance
Cardiovascular Diseases
Fats
Cholesterol
Inflammation
Muscles
Mortality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rheumatology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Rheumatoid arthritis and metabolic syndrome. / Kerekes, G.; Nurmohamed, Michael T.; González-Gay, Miguel A.; Seres, I.; Paragh, G.; Kardos, Zsófia; Baráth, Zsuzsa; Tamási, László; Soltész, P.; Szekanecz, Z.

In: Nature Reviews Rheumatology, Vol. 10, No. 11, 05.11.2014, p. 691-696.

Research output: Article

Kerekes, G, Nurmohamed, MT, González-Gay, MA, Seres, I, Paragh, G, Kardos, Z, Baráth, Z, Tamási, L, Soltész, P & Szekanecz, Z 2014, 'Rheumatoid arthritis and metabolic syndrome', Nature Reviews Rheumatology, vol. 10, no. 11, pp. 691-696. https://doi.org/10.1038/nrrheum.2014.121
Kerekes, G. ; Nurmohamed, Michael T. ; González-Gay, Miguel A. ; Seres, I. ; Paragh, G. ; Kardos, Zsófia ; Baráth, Zsuzsa ; Tamási, László ; Soltész, P. ; Szekanecz, Z. / Rheumatoid arthritis and metabolic syndrome. In: Nature Reviews Rheumatology. 2014 ; Vol. 10, No. 11. pp. 691-696.
@article{b43a0fb2b3774eeb8508d5dbb3f0997a,
title = "Rheumatoid arthritis and metabolic syndrome",
abstract = "Rheumatoid arthritis (RA), especially active disease, is associated with considerable changes in body composition, lipids, adipokines and insulin sensitivity. Metabolic changes, such as increased total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol and triglyceride levels, occur even in preclinical RA. Active RA is associated with decreased lipid levels, BMI, fat and muscle mass, as well as altered lipid profiles. Some of these changes are also seen in metabolic syndrome, and could increase cardiovascular mortality. Importantly, the systemic inflammation underlying RA is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. This Perspectives article summarizes data on the associations of various components of metabolic syndrome with RA, and discusses the effects of biologic therapy on these factors. The authors propose that components of metabolic syndrome should be monitored in patients with RA throughout the disease course, and argue that optimal disease control using biologic agents might attenuate several adverse effects of metabolic syndrome in these patients.",
author = "G. Kerekes and Nurmohamed, {Michael T.} and Gonz{\'a}lez-Gay, {Miguel A.} and I. Seres and G. Paragh and Zs{\'o}fia Kardos and Zsuzsa Bar{\'a}th and L{\'a}szl{\'o} Tam{\'a}si and P. Solt{\'e}sz and Z. Szekanecz",
year = "2014",
month = "11",
day = "5",
doi = "10.1038/nrrheum.2014.121",
language = "English",
volume = "10",
pages = "691--696",
journal = "Nature reviews. Rheumatology",
issn = "1759-4790",
publisher = "Nature Publishing Group",
number = "11",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Rheumatoid arthritis and metabolic syndrome

AU - Kerekes, G.

AU - Nurmohamed, Michael T.

AU - González-Gay, Miguel A.

AU - Seres, I.

AU - Paragh, G.

AU - Kardos, Zsófia

AU - Baráth, Zsuzsa

AU - Tamási, László

AU - Soltész, P.

AU - Szekanecz, Z.

PY - 2014/11/5

Y1 - 2014/11/5

N2 - Rheumatoid arthritis (RA), especially active disease, is associated with considerable changes in body composition, lipids, adipokines and insulin sensitivity. Metabolic changes, such as increased total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol and triglyceride levels, occur even in preclinical RA. Active RA is associated with decreased lipid levels, BMI, fat and muscle mass, as well as altered lipid profiles. Some of these changes are also seen in metabolic syndrome, and could increase cardiovascular mortality. Importantly, the systemic inflammation underlying RA is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. This Perspectives article summarizes data on the associations of various components of metabolic syndrome with RA, and discusses the effects of biologic therapy on these factors. The authors propose that components of metabolic syndrome should be monitored in patients with RA throughout the disease course, and argue that optimal disease control using biologic agents might attenuate several adverse effects of metabolic syndrome in these patients.

AB - Rheumatoid arthritis (RA), especially active disease, is associated with considerable changes in body composition, lipids, adipokines and insulin sensitivity. Metabolic changes, such as increased total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol and triglyceride levels, occur even in preclinical RA. Active RA is associated with decreased lipid levels, BMI, fat and muscle mass, as well as altered lipid profiles. Some of these changes are also seen in metabolic syndrome, and could increase cardiovascular mortality. Importantly, the systemic inflammation underlying RA is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. This Perspectives article summarizes data on the associations of various components of metabolic syndrome with RA, and discusses the effects of biologic therapy on these factors. The authors propose that components of metabolic syndrome should be monitored in patients with RA throughout the disease course, and argue that optimal disease control using biologic agents might attenuate several adverse effects of metabolic syndrome in these patients.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84908505393&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84908505393&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1038/nrrheum.2014.121

DO - 10.1038/nrrheum.2014.121

M3 - Article

C2 - 25090948

AN - SCOPUS:84908505393

VL - 10

SP - 691

EP - 696

JO - Nature reviews. Rheumatology

JF - Nature reviews. Rheumatology

SN - 1759-4790

IS - 11

ER -