Predictors for 2-year outcome of major depressive episode

Erika Szádóczky, S. Rózsa, János Zámbori, János Füredi

Research output: Article

51 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this 2-year prospective study, we searched for predictive factors influencing the 2-year outcome of major depressive episodes. Demographic characteristics (age, gender, education, employment), illness-related variables (severity, age at onset, number and duration of previous episodes), personality characteristics (DSM-IV personality disorders, trait anxiety, coping style), life context factors (life events before and during the depressive episode, social support, social adjustment), and biological markers (dexamethasone suppression test, thyroid stimulating hormone levels) of 117 inpatients with major depressive episode were assessed. A structural equation model was used to test the proposed correlational structure of the relevant variables. The non-remission of the depressive symptoms by the end of a 6-week acute treatment phase was found to be the most relevant factor predicting sustained non-remission at the end of a 2-year follow-up period. At the end of the sixth week, the severity of depression depended on the level of social support and on the severity of depression at baseline. Among the baseline variables, anxious personality traits and a lower level of education predicted a high level of depressive symptoms at the end of the 2-year follow-up. Life events before and during the depressive episode, and the biological markers at baseline had no direct effect on the outcome. The rapid remission of the depressive symptoms is the most important predictor for the favorable long-term outcome of a depressive episode. Personality characteristics, social support and level of education, - interacting with each other - also play a significant role.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)49-57
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Affective Disorders
Volume83
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - nov. 15 2004

Fingerprint

Depression
Social Support
Personality
Education
Biomarkers
Social Adjustment
Structural Models
Personality Disorders
Thyrotropin
Age of Onset
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Dexamethasone
Life Style
Inpatients
Anxiety
Demography
Prospective Studies
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Behavioral Neuroscience
  • Biological Psychiatry
  • Neurology
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Predictors for 2-year outcome of major depressive episode. / Szádóczky, Erika; Rózsa, S.; Zámbori, János; Füredi, János.

In: Journal of Affective Disorders, Vol. 83, No. 1, 15.11.2004, p. 49-57.

Research output: Article

Szádóczky, Erika ; Rózsa, S. ; Zámbori, János ; Füredi, János. / Predictors for 2-year outcome of major depressive episode. In: Journal of Affective Disorders. 2004 ; Vol. 83, No. 1. pp. 49-57.
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