Perfusion-decellularization of porcine lung and trachea for respiratory bioengineering

Alexander Weymann, Nikhil Prakash Patil, Anton Sabashnikov, Sevil Korkmaz, Shiliang Li, P. Soós, Roland Ishtok, Nicole Chaimow, Ines Pätzold, Natalie Czerny, Bastian Schmack, Aron Frederik Popov, Andre Rüdiger Simon, Matthias Karck, G. Szabó

Research output: Article

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Decellularization of native organs may provide an acellular tissue platform for organ regeneration. However, decellularization involves a trade-off between removal of immunogenic cellular elements and preservation of biomechanical integrity. We sought to develop a bioartificial scaffold for respiratory tissue engineering by decellularization of porcine lungs and trachea while preserving organ architecture and vasculature. Lung-trachea preparations from 25 German Landrace pigs were perfused in a modified Langendorff circuit and decellularized by an SDC (sodium deoxycholate)-based perfusion protocol. Decellularization was evaluated by histology and fluorescence microscopy, and residual DNA quantified spectrophotometrically and compared with controls. Airway compliance was evaluated by endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation to simulate physiological breathing-induced stretch. Structural integrity was evaluated by bronchoscopy and biomechanical stress/strain analysis by measuring passive tensile strength, all compared with controls. Decellularized lungs and trachea lacked intracellular components but retained specific collagen fibers and elastin. Quantitative DNA analysis demonstrated a significant reduction of DNA compared with controls (32.8±12.4μg DNA/mg tissue vs. 179.7±35.8μg DNA/mg tissue, P

Original languageEnglish
JournalArtificial Organs
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2015

Fingerprint

Bioengineering
Trachea
DNA
Swine
Perfusion
Lung
Tissue
Elastin
Histology
Deoxycholic Acid
Intratracheal Intubation
Tensile Strength
Fluorescence microscopy
Bronchoscopy
Structural integrity
Tissue Engineering
Scaffolds (biology)
Fluorescence Microscopy
Artificial Respiration
Tissue engineering

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomaterials
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Bioengineering
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Perfusion-decellularization of porcine lung and trachea for respiratory bioengineering. / Weymann, Alexander; Patil, Nikhil Prakash; Sabashnikov, Anton; Korkmaz, Sevil; Li, Shiliang; Soós, P.; Ishtok, Roland; Chaimow, Nicole; Pätzold, Ines; Czerny, Natalie; Schmack, Bastian; Popov, Aron Frederik; Simon, Andre Rüdiger; Karck, Matthias; Szabó, G.

In: Artificial Organs, 2015.

Research output: Article

Weymann, A, Patil, NP, Sabashnikov, A, Korkmaz, S, Li, S, Soós, P, Ishtok, R, Chaimow, N, Pätzold, I, Czerny, N, Schmack, B, Popov, AF, Simon, AR, Karck, M & Szabó, G 2015, 'Perfusion-decellularization of porcine lung and trachea for respiratory bioengineering', Artificial Organs. https://doi.org/10.1111/aor.12481
Weymann, Alexander ; Patil, Nikhil Prakash ; Sabashnikov, Anton ; Korkmaz, Sevil ; Li, Shiliang ; Soós, P. ; Ishtok, Roland ; Chaimow, Nicole ; Pätzold, Ines ; Czerny, Natalie ; Schmack, Bastian ; Popov, Aron Frederik ; Simon, Andre Rüdiger ; Karck, Matthias ; Szabó, G. / Perfusion-decellularization of porcine lung and trachea for respiratory bioengineering. In: Artificial Organs. 2015.
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