Osteochondral integration of multiply incised pure cartilage allograft: repair method of focal chondral defects in a porcine model.

T. Bárdos, Boglarka Farkas, Beata Mezes, Jozsef Vancsodi, K. Kvell, T. Czömpöly, P. Németh, Arpad Bellyei, Tamas Illes

Research output: Article

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: A focal cartilage lesion has limited capacity to heal, and the repair modalities used at present are still unable to provide a universal solution. Pure cartilage graft implantation appears to be a simple option, but it has not been applied widely as cartilage will not reattach easily to the subchondral bone. HYPOTHESIS: We used a multiple-incision technique (processed chondrograft) to increase cartilage graft surface. We hypothesized that pure cartilage graft with augmented osteochondral fusion capacity may be used for cartilage repair and we compared this method with other repair techniques. STUDY DESIGN: Controlled laboratory study. METHODS: Full-thickness focal cartilage defects were created on the medial femoral condyle of 9-month-old pigs; defects were repaired using various methods including bone marrow stimulation, autologous chondrocyte implantation, and processed chondrograft. After the repair, at weeks 6 and 24, macroscopic and histologic evaluation was carried out. RESULTS: Compared with other methods, processed chondrograft was found to be similarly effective in cartilage repair. Defects without repair and defects treated with bone marrow stimulation appeared slightly irregular with fibrocartilage filling. Autologous chondrocyte implantation produced hyalinelike cartilage, although its cellular organization was distinguishable from the surrounding articular cartilage. Processed chondrograft demonstrated good osteochondral integration, and the resulting tissue appeared to be hyaline cartilage. CONCLUSION: The applied cartilage surface processing method allows acceptable osteochondral integration, and the repair tissue appears to have good macroscopic and histologic characteristics. CLINICAL RELEVANCE: If further studies confirm its efficacy, this technique could be considered for human application in the future.

Original languageEnglish
JournalAmerican Journal of Sports Medicine
Volume37 Suppl 1
Publication statusPublished - nov. 2009

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Cartilage
Allografts
Swine
Chondrocytes
Transplants
Bone Marrow
Fibrocartilage
Hyaline Cartilage
Bone and Bones
Articular Cartilage
Thigh

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

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title = "Osteochondral integration of multiply incised pure cartilage allograft: repair method of focal chondral defects in a porcine model.",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: A focal cartilage lesion has limited capacity to heal, and the repair modalities used at present are still unable to provide a universal solution. Pure cartilage graft implantation appears to be a simple option, but it has not been applied widely as cartilage will not reattach easily to the subchondral bone. HYPOTHESIS: We used a multiple-incision technique (processed chondrograft) to increase cartilage graft surface. We hypothesized that pure cartilage graft with augmented osteochondral fusion capacity may be used for cartilage repair and we compared this method with other repair techniques. STUDY DESIGN: Controlled laboratory study. METHODS: Full-thickness focal cartilage defects were created on the medial femoral condyle of 9-month-old pigs; defects were repaired using various methods including bone marrow stimulation, autologous chondrocyte implantation, and processed chondrograft. After the repair, at weeks 6 and 24, macroscopic and histologic evaluation was carried out. RESULTS: Compared with other methods, processed chondrograft was found to be similarly effective in cartilage repair. Defects without repair and defects treated with bone marrow stimulation appeared slightly irregular with fibrocartilage filling. Autologous chondrocyte implantation produced hyalinelike cartilage, although its cellular organization was distinguishable from the surrounding articular cartilage. Processed chondrograft demonstrated good osteochondral integration, and the resulting tissue appeared to be hyaline cartilage. CONCLUSION: The applied cartilage surface processing method allows acceptable osteochondral integration, and the repair tissue appears to have good macroscopic and histologic characteristics. CLINICAL RELEVANCE: If further studies confirm its efficacy, this technique could be considered for human application in the future.",
author = "T. B{\'a}rdos and Boglarka Farkas and Beata Mezes and Jozsef Vancsodi and K. Kvell and T. Cz{\"o}mp{\"o}ly and P. N{\'e}meth and Arpad Bellyei and Tamas Illes",
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T1 - Osteochondral integration of multiply incised pure cartilage allograft

T2 - repair method of focal chondral defects in a porcine model.

AU - Bárdos, T.

AU - Farkas, Boglarka

AU - Mezes, Beata

AU - Vancsodi, Jozsef

AU - Kvell, K.

AU - Czömpöly, T.

AU - Németh, P.

AU - Bellyei, Arpad

AU - Illes, Tamas

PY - 2009/11

Y1 - 2009/11

N2 - BACKGROUND: A focal cartilage lesion has limited capacity to heal, and the repair modalities used at present are still unable to provide a universal solution. Pure cartilage graft implantation appears to be a simple option, but it has not been applied widely as cartilage will not reattach easily to the subchondral bone. HYPOTHESIS: We used a multiple-incision technique (processed chondrograft) to increase cartilage graft surface. We hypothesized that pure cartilage graft with augmented osteochondral fusion capacity may be used for cartilage repair and we compared this method with other repair techniques. STUDY DESIGN: Controlled laboratory study. METHODS: Full-thickness focal cartilage defects were created on the medial femoral condyle of 9-month-old pigs; defects were repaired using various methods including bone marrow stimulation, autologous chondrocyte implantation, and processed chondrograft. After the repair, at weeks 6 and 24, macroscopic and histologic evaluation was carried out. RESULTS: Compared with other methods, processed chondrograft was found to be similarly effective in cartilage repair. Defects without repair and defects treated with bone marrow stimulation appeared slightly irregular with fibrocartilage filling. Autologous chondrocyte implantation produced hyalinelike cartilage, although its cellular organization was distinguishable from the surrounding articular cartilage. Processed chondrograft demonstrated good osteochondral integration, and the resulting tissue appeared to be hyaline cartilage. CONCLUSION: The applied cartilage surface processing method allows acceptable osteochondral integration, and the repair tissue appears to have good macroscopic and histologic characteristics. CLINICAL RELEVANCE: If further studies confirm its efficacy, this technique could be considered for human application in the future.

AB - BACKGROUND: A focal cartilage lesion has limited capacity to heal, and the repair modalities used at present are still unable to provide a universal solution. Pure cartilage graft implantation appears to be a simple option, but it has not been applied widely as cartilage will not reattach easily to the subchondral bone. HYPOTHESIS: We used a multiple-incision technique (processed chondrograft) to increase cartilage graft surface. We hypothesized that pure cartilage graft with augmented osteochondral fusion capacity may be used for cartilage repair and we compared this method with other repair techniques. STUDY DESIGN: Controlled laboratory study. METHODS: Full-thickness focal cartilage defects were created on the medial femoral condyle of 9-month-old pigs; defects were repaired using various methods including bone marrow stimulation, autologous chondrocyte implantation, and processed chondrograft. After the repair, at weeks 6 and 24, macroscopic and histologic evaluation was carried out. RESULTS: Compared with other methods, processed chondrograft was found to be similarly effective in cartilage repair. Defects without repair and defects treated with bone marrow stimulation appeared slightly irregular with fibrocartilage filling. Autologous chondrocyte implantation produced hyalinelike cartilage, although its cellular organization was distinguishable from the surrounding articular cartilage. Processed chondrograft demonstrated good osteochondral integration, and the resulting tissue appeared to be hyaline cartilage. CONCLUSION: The applied cartilage surface processing method allows acceptable osteochondral integration, and the repair tissue appears to have good macroscopic and histologic characteristics. CLINICAL RELEVANCE: If further studies confirm its efficacy, this technique could be considered for human application in the future.

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