On the relationship between debris disks and planets

Ågnes Kóspál, David R. Ardila, A. Moór, P. Ábrahám

Research output: Article

49 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Dust in debris disks is generated by collisions among planetesimals. The existence of these planetesimals is a consequence of the planet formation process, but the relationship between debris disks and planets has not been clearly established. Here we analyze Spitzer/MIPS 24 and 70 μm data for 150 planet-bearing stars, and compare the incidence of debris disks around these stars with a sample of 118 stars around which planets have been searched for, but not found. Together they comprise the largest sample ever assembled to deal with this question. The use of survival analysis techniques allows us to account for the large number of nondetections at 70 μm. We discovered 10 new debris disks around stars with planets and one around a star without known planets. We found that the incidence of debris disks is marginally higher among stars with planets, than among those without, and that the brightness of the average debris disk is not significantly different in the two samples. We conclude that the presence of a planet that has been detected via current radial velocity techniques is not a good predictor of the presence of a debris disk detected at infrared wavelengths.

Original languageEnglish
JournalAstrophysical Journal
Volume700
Issue number2 PART 2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009

Fingerprint

debris
planets
planet
stars
protoplanets
planetesimal
incidence
radial velocity
brightness
collision
dust
wavelength
collisions
predictions
wavelengths

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nuclear and High Energy Physics
  • Space and Planetary Science
  • Astronomy and Astrophysics

Cite this

On the relationship between debris disks and planets. / Kóspál, Ågnes; Ardila, David R.; Moór, A.; Ábrahám, P.

In: Astrophysical Journal, Vol. 700, No. 2 PART 2, 2009.

Research output: Article

Kóspál, Ågnes ; Ardila, David R. ; Moór, A. ; Ábrahám, P. / On the relationship between debris disks and planets. In: Astrophysical Journal. 2009 ; Vol. 700, No. 2 PART 2.
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