On the lack of capillary Mössbauer spectroscopic effect for SnII-containing aqueous solutions trapped in corning Vycor ‘thirsty’ glass

Éva G. Bajnóczi, Bíborka Bohner, Eszter Czeglédi, E. Kuzmann, Z. Homonnay, Attila Lengyel, I. Pálinkó, P. Sipos

Research output: Article

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Liquids trapped in the pores of certain silicate glasses (such as Corning Vycor ‘thirsty’ glass) were found to display frozen solutions like behavior at temperatures much higher than their actual freezing point. For example, recoilless γ-resonance absorption was observed for Mössbauer active solutes such as 119Sn and 57Fe salts at room temperature (i.e., without the need of quenching). Thus capillary Mössbauer spectroscopy (CMS) proved to be a new and useful experimental tool with great potential in solution chemistry. As part of a research project concerned with the hydrolysis of SnII salts, we attempted to perform 119Sn CMS measurements for solutions containing stannous ion in a range of aqueous environments. Somewhat surprisingly, we found that under ambient conditions, SnII aqueous liquid solutions, both the acidic and the basic systems, are essentially CMS-silent. This can be attributed to the strong temperature dependence of Lamb–Mössbauer factor of SnII species, which may result in the complete disappearance of Mössbauer pattern well below room temperature. These observations can also explain why previous publications concerned with the use of CMS dealt exclusively with SnIV and not with SnII containing liquids.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)695-700
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry
Volume302
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Fingerprint

Glass
Spectrum Analysis
Spectroscopy
Temperature
Liquids
Salts
Silicates
Freezing
Quenching
Hydrolysis
Ions
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Analytical Chemistry
  • Nuclear Energy and Engineering
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis
  • Pollution
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Spectroscopy
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

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title = "On the lack of capillary M{\"o}ssbauer spectroscopic effect for SnII-containing aqueous solutions trapped in corning Vycor ‘thirsty’ glass",
abstract = "Liquids trapped in the pores of certain silicate glasses (such as Corning Vycor ‘thirsty’ glass) were found to display frozen solutions like behavior at temperatures much higher than their actual freezing point. For example, recoilless γ-resonance absorption was observed for M{\"o}ssbauer active solutes such as 119Sn and 57Fe salts at room temperature (i.e., without the need of quenching). Thus capillary M{\"o}ssbauer spectroscopy (CMS) proved to be a new and useful experimental tool with great potential in solution chemistry. As part of a research project concerned with the hydrolysis of SnII salts, we attempted to perform 119Sn CMS measurements for solutions containing stannous ion in a range of aqueous environments. Somewhat surprisingly, we found that under ambient conditions, SnII aqueous liquid solutions, both the acidic and the basic systems, are essentially CMS-silent. This can be attributed to the strong temperature dependence of Lamb–M{\"o}ssbauer factor of SnII species, which may result in the complete disappearance of M{\"o}ssbauer pattern well below room temperature. These observations can also explain why previous publications concerned with the use of CMS dealt exclusively with SnIV and not with SnII containing liquids.",
keywords = "Aqueous solution, Capillary M{\"o}ssbauer spectroscopy, Stannous ion, ‘Thirsty’ glass",
author = "Bajn{\'o}czi, {{\'E}va G.} and B{\'i}borka Bohner and Eszter Czegl{\'e}di and E. Kuzmann and Z. Homonnay and Attila Lengyel and I. P{\'a}link{\'o} and P. Sipos",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - On the lack of capillary Mössbauer spectroscopic effect for SnII-containing aqueous solutions trapped in corning Vycor ‘thirsty’ glass

AU - Bajnóczi, Éva G.

AU - Bohner, Bíborka

AU - Czeglédi, Eszter

AU - Kuzmann, E.

AU - Homonnay, Z.

AU - Lengyel, Attila

AU - Pálinkó, I.

AU - Sipos, P.

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - Liquids trapped in the pores of certain silicate glasses (such as Corning Vycor ‘thirsty’ glass) were found to display frozen solutions like behavior at temperatures much higher than their actual freezing point. For example, recoilless γ-resonance absorption was observed for Mössbauer active solutes such as 119Sn and 57Fe salts at room temperature (i.e., without the need of quenching). Thus capillary Mössbauer spectroscopy (CMS) proved to be a new and useful experimental tool with great potential in solution chemistry. As part of a research project concerned with the hydrolysis of SnII salts, we attempted to perform 119Sn CMS measurements for solutions containing stannous ion in a range of aqueous environments. Somewhat surprisingly, we found that under ambient conditions, SnII aqueous liquid solutions, both the acidic and the basic systems, are essentially CMS-silent. This can be attributed to the strong temperature dependence of Lamb–Mössbauer factor of SnII species, which may result in the complete disappearance of Mössbauer pattern well below room temperature. These observations can also explain why previous publications concerned with the use of CMS dealt exclusively with SnIV and not with SnII containing liquids.

AB - Liquids trapped in the pores of certain silicate glasses (such as Corning Vycor ‘thirsty’ glass) were found to display frozen solutions like behavior at temperatures much higher than their actual freezing point. For example, recoilless γ-resonance absorption was observed for Mössbauer active solutes such as 119Sn and 57Fe salts at room temperature (i.e., without the need of quenching). Thus capillary Mössbauer spectroscopy (CMS) proved to be a new and useful experimental tool with great potential in solution chemistry. As part of a research project concerned with the hydrolysis of SnII salts, we attempted to perform 119Sn CMS measurements for solutions containing stannous ion in a range of aqueous environments. Somewhat surprisingly, we found that under ambient conditions, SnII aqueous liquid solutions, both the acidic and the basic systems, are essentially CMS-silent. This can be attributed to the strong temperature dependence of Lamb–Mössbauer factor of SnII species, which may result in the complete disappearance of Mössbauer pattern well below room temperature. These observations can also explain why previous publications concerned with the use of CMS dealt exclusively with SnIV and not with SnII containing liquids.

KW - Aqueous solution

KW - Capillary Mössbauer spectroscopy

KW - Stannous ion

KW - ‘Thirsty’ glass

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