Occurrence and distribution of trifluralin, ethalfluralin, and pendimethalin in soils used for long-term intensive cotton cultivation in central greece

Helen Karasali, George Pavlidis, Anna Marousopoulou, Arpad Ambrus

Research output: Article

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In the present study, a soil monitoring program was undertaken in Greek cotton cultivated areas in 2012. Twenty-seven soil samples were collected from the entire Thessaly plain in early summer of 2012, corresponding to approximately three months (current use of pendimethalin), up to one year (for the banned ethalfluralin), and three years (for the also banned trifluralin), after the last dinitroaniline application. Low but not negligible levels of dinitroanilines were detected, ranging from 0.01 to 0.21 mg g¡1 d.w. for trifluralin and 0.01–0.048 mg g¡1 d.w. for pendimethalin, respectively. Trifluralin was the herbicide most frequently detected (44.4%). The high historic application of trifluralin and its high persistence and accumulation potential is in line with the abundance of the detected residues. The present data indicate that soil samples contain extractable residues of banned trifluralin, but based on the comparison of the theoretical PECplateau for trifluralin (0.277 mg g¡1) and the maximum Measured Environmental Concentration, it was concluded that the detected residues should be attributed to previous years’ application. The latter suggested the need for continual monitoring of the dinitroaniline family of pesticides, including the banned substances, aiming thus to an improved environmental profile for agricultural areas.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)719-728
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Environmental Science and Health - Part B Pesticides, Food Contaminants, and Agricultural Wastes
Volume52
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - szept. 21 2017

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Pollution

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Occurrence and distribution of trifluralin, ethalfluralin, and pendimethalin in soils used for long-term intensive cotton cultivation in central greece'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this