Morphology and properties of particulate filled polymers

Research output: Conference contribution

58 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although the structure of particulate filled polymers is usually thought to be very simple, often structure related phenomena determine their properties. Segregation occurs only when long flow paths and large particles are used in production. The occurrence and extent of aggregation depend on the relative magnitude of attractive and separating forces, which prevail during the homogenization of the composite; the balance of adhesive and shear forces determines structure. Fillers of small particle size always aggregate, usually leading to decreased strength and especially low impact resistance. Anisotropic particles (talc, mica, short fibers) are orientated during processing. ESR is a relatively simple technique for the estimation of orientation and orientation distribution, which are determined by processing conditions, i.e. flow pattern, shear conditions, mold filling rates, cooling conditions, etc. The orientation of the particles strongly affects composite stiffness and strength. In practice, often several factors simultaneously influence the properties of products prepared from particulate filled polymers. Separation of the effects of the influencing factors is difficult, although such knowledge would help to control composite properties. The structure and properties of injection and compression moulded PP composites containing CaCO3 or talc differs considerably from each other. The aggregation of CaCO3, the nucleating effect and the orientation of talc affect product properties. The latter are also influenced by the skin-core structure developing during injection molding as well as by the orientation of the polymer. An example is discussed in this paper, which facilitates the identification of the effect of these factors with the help of a simple model and indicates a way in which product properties can be controlled.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationMacromolecular Symposia
Pages115-134
Number of pages20
Volume214
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - aug. 2004

Fingerprint

Filled polymers
Talc
Composite materials
Agglomeration
Impact resistance
Mica
Processing
Injection molding
Flow patterns
Paramagnetic resonance
Fillers
Adhesives
Skin
Polymers
Compaction
Particle size
Stiffness
Cooling
Fibers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Polymers and Plastics
  • Materials Chemistry

Cite this

Morphology and properties of particulate filled polymers. / Pukánszky, B.; Móczó, J.

Macromolecular Symposia. Vol. 214 2004. p. 115-134.

Research output: Conference contribution

Pukánszky, B. ; Móczó, J. / Morphology and properties of particulate filled polymers. Macromolecular Symposia. Vol. 214 2004. pp. 115-134
@inproceedings{72d736341282427b9625503cdb83cf41,
title = "Morphology and properties of particulate filled polymers",
abstract = "Although the structure of particulate filled polymers is usually thought to be very simple, often structure related phenomena determine their properties. Segregation occurs only when long flow paths and large particles are used in production. The occurrence and extent of aggregation depend on the relative magnitude of attractive and separating forces, which prevail during the homogenization of the composite; the balance of adhesive and shear forces determines structure. Fillers of small particle size always aggregate, usually leading to decreased strength and especially low impact resistance. Anisotropic particles (talc, mica, short fibers) are orientated during processing. ESR is a relatively simple technique for the estimation of orientation and orientation distribution, which are determined by processing conditions, i.e. flow pattern, shear conditions, mold filling rates, cooling conditions, etc. The orientation of the particles strongly affects composite stiffness and strength. In practice, often several factors simultaneously influence the properties of products prepared from particulate filled polymers. Separation of the effects of the influencing factors is difficult, although such knowledge would help to control composite properties. The structure and properties of injection and compression moulded PP composites containing CaCO3 or talc differs considerably from each other. The aggregation of CaCO3, the nucleating effect and the orientation of talc affect product properties. The latter are also influenced by the skin-core structure developing during injection molding as well as by the orientation of the polymer. An example is discussed in this paper, which facilitates the identification of the effect of these factors with the help of a simple model and indicates a way in which product properties can be controlled.",
keywords = "Aggregation, Crystalline structure, Mechanical properties, Orientation, Particulate fillers, Segregation, Structure-property correlation",
author = "B. Puk{\'a}nszky and J. M{\'o}cz{\'o}",
year = "2004",
month = "8",
doi = "10.1002/masy.200451009",
language = "English",
volume = "214",
pages = "115--134",
booktitle = "Macromolecular Symposia",

}

TY - GEN

T1 - Morphology and properties of particulate filled polymers

AU - Pukánszky, B.

AU - Móczó, J.

PY - 2004/8

Y1 - 2004/8

N2 - Although the structure of particulate filled polymers is usually thought to be very simple, often structure related phenomena determine their properties. Segregation occurs only when long flow paths and large particles are used in production. The occurrence and extent of aggregation depend on the relative magnitude of attractive and separating forces, which prevail during the homogenization of the composite; the balance of adhesive and shear forces determines structure. Fillers of small particle size always aggregate, usually leading to decreased strength and especially low impact resistance. Anisotropic particles (talc, mica, short fibers) are orientated during processing. ESR is a relatively simple technique for the estimation of orientation and orientation distribution, which are determined by processing conditions, i.e. flow pattern, shear conditions, mold filling rates, cooling conditions, etc. The orientation of the particles strongly affects composite stiffness and strength. In practice, often several factors simultaneously influence the properties of products prepared from particulate filled polymers. Separation of the effects of the influencing factors is difficult, although such knowledge would help to control composite properties. The structure and properties of injection and compression moulded PP composites containing CaCO3 or talc differs considerably from each other. The aggregation of CaCO3, the nucleating effect and the orientation of talc affect product properties. The latter are also influenced by the skin-core structure developing during injection molding as well as by the orientation of the polymer. An example is discussed in this paper, which facilitates the identification of the effect of these factors with the help of a simple model and indicates a way in which product properties can be controlled.

AB - Although the structure of particulate filled polymers is usually thought to be very simple, often structure related phenomena determine their properties. Segregation occurs only when long flow paths and large particles are used in production. The occurrence and extent of aggregation depend on the relative magnitude of attractive and separating forces, which prevail during the homogenization of the composite; the balance of adhesive and shear forces determines structure. Fillers of small particle size always aggregate, usually leading to decreased strength and especially low impact resistance. Anisotropic particles (talc, mica, short fibers) are orientated during processing. ESR is a relatively simple technique for the estimation of orientation and orientation distribution, which are determined by processing conditions, i.e. flow pattern, shear conditions, mold filling rates, cooling conditions, etc. The orientation of the particles strongly affects composite stiffness and strength. In practice, often several factors simultaneously influence the properties of products prepared from particulate filled polymers. Separation of the effects of the influencing factors is difficult, although such knowledge would help to control composite properties. The structure and properties of injection and compression moulded PP composites containing CaCO3 or talc differs considerably from each other. The aggregation of CaCO3, the nucleating effect and the orientation of talc affect product properties. The latter are also influenced by the skin-core structure developing during injection molding as well as by the orientation of the polymer. An example is discussed in this paper, which facilitates the identification of the effect of these factors with the help of a simple model and indicates a way in which product properties can be controlled.

KW - Aggregation

KW - Crystalline structure

KW - Mechanical properties

KW - Orientation

KW - Particulate fillers

KW - Segregation

KW - Structure-property correlation

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=19544366604&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=19544366604&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/masy.200451009

DO - 10.1002/masy.200451009

M3 - Conference contribution

AN - SCOPUS:19544366604

VL - 214

SP - 115

EP - 134

BT - Macromolecular Symposia

ER -