Minimal clinically important differences for the experiences of daily living parts of movement disorder society–sponsored unified Parkinson's disease rating scale

Krisztina Horváth, Zsuzsanna Aschermann, Márton Kovács, Attila Makkos, Márk Harmat, József Janszky, Sámuel Komoly, Kázmér Karádi, Norbert Kovács

Research output: Article

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The minimal clinically important difference is the smallest change of scores clinically meaningful to patients. Objectives: We aimed to calculate these threshold values in association with the International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society UPDRS (MDS-UPDRS) Parts I and II and to evaluate the feasibility of the composite score of Part I and II (MDS-UPDRS I+II) as an outcome. Methods: Nine hundred eighty-five paired investigations of 365 patients were reviewed, implementing three different techniques simultaneously. Results: Based on the ordinal regression modeling, the MDS-UPDRS I+II score is an applicable outcome measure. Any improvement greater than 2.64 points or any worsening more than 2.45 points on MDS-UPDRS Part I represent a minimal, yet clinically meaningful change. In reference to Part II, the smallest changes considered clinically relevant were 3.05 and 2.51 points for improvement and deterioration, respectively. The thresholds for MDS-UPDRS I+II were 5.73 points for improvement and 4.70 points for worsening. Conclusions: Our minimal clinically important difference thresholds can be utilized in clinical practice in judging clinical relevance.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)789-793
Number of pages5
JournalMovement Disorders
Volume32
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - máj. 2017

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Minimal clinically important differences for the experiences of daily living parts of movement disorder society–sponsored unified Parkinson's disease rating scale'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this