Medicago truncatula DMI1 Required for Bacterial and Fungal Symbioses in Legumes

Jean Michel Ané, G. Kiss, Brendan K. Riely, R. Varma Penmetsa, Giles E D Oldroyd, Céline Ayax, Julien Lévy, Frédéric Debellé, Jong Min Baek, P. Kaló, Charles Rosenberg, Bruce A. Roe, Sharon R. Long, Jean Dénarié, Douglas R. Cook

Research output: Article

361 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Legumes form symbiotic associations with both mycorrhizal fungi and nitrogen-fixing soil bacteria called rhizobia. Several of the plant genes required for transduction of rhizobial signals, the Nod factors, are also necessary for mycorrhizal symbiosis. Here, we describe the cloning and characterization of one such gene from the legume Medicago truncatula. The DMI1 (does not make infections) gene encodes a novel protein with low global similarity to a ligand-gated cation channel domain of archaea. The protein is highly conserved in angiosperms and ancestral to land plants. We suggest that DMI1 represents an ancient plant-specific innovation, potentially enabling mycorrhizal associations.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1364-1367
Number of pages4
JournalScience
Volume303
Issue number5662
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - febr. 27 2004

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Medicago truncatula
Symbiosis
Fabaceae
Embryophyta
Ligand-Gated Ion Channels
Angiosperms
Plant Genes
Rhizobium
Archaea
Genes
Cations
Organism Cloning
Signal Transduction
Proteins
Fungi
Soil
Infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Ané, J. M., Kiss, G., Riely, B. K., Penmetsa, R. V., Oldroyd, G. E. D., Ayax, C., ... Cook, D. R. (2004). Medicago truncatula DMI1 Required for Bacterial and Fungal Symbioses in Legumes. Science, 303(5662), 1364-1367. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1092986

Medicago truncatula DMI1 Required for Bacterial and Fungal Symbioses in Legumes. / Ané, Jean Michel; Kiss, G.; Riely, Brendan K.; Penmetsa, R. Varma; Oldroyd, Giles E D; Ayax, Céline; Lévy, Julien; Debellé, Frédéric; Baek, Jong Min; Kaló, P.; Rosenberg, Charles; Roe, Bruce A.; Long, Sharon R.; Dénarié, Jean; Cook, Douglas R.

In: Science, Vol. 303, No. 5662, 27.02.2004, p. 1364-1367.

Research output: Article

Ané, JM, Kiss, G, Riely, BK, Penmetsa, RV, Oldroyd, GED, Ayax, C, Lévy, J, Debellé, F, Baek, JM, Kaló, P, Rosenberg, C, Roe, BA, Long, SR, Dénarié, J & Cook, DR 2004, 'Medicago truncatula DMI1 Required for Bacterial and Fungal Symbioses in Legumes', Science, vol. 303, no. 5662, pp. 1364-1367. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1092986
Ané JM, Kiss G, Riely BK, Penmetsa RV, Oldroyd GED, Ayax C et al. Medicago truncatula DMI1 Required for Bacterial and Fungal Symbioses in Legumes. Science. 2004 febr. 27;303(5662):1364-1367. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1092986
Ané, Jean Michel ; Kiss, G. ; Riely, Brendan K. ; Penmetsa, R. Varma ; Oldroyd, Giles E D ; Ayax, Céline ; Lévy, Julien ; Debellé, Frédéric ; Baek, Jong Min ; Kaló, P. ; Rosenberg, Charles ; Roe, Bruce A. ; Long, Sharon R. ; Dénarié, Jean ; Cook, Douglas R. / Medicago truncatula DMI1 Required for Bacterial and Fungal Symbioses in Legumes. In: Science. 2004 ; Vol. 303, No. 5662. pp. 1364-1367.
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