Linking PANSS negative symptom scores with the Clinical Global Impressions Scale

understanding negative symptom scores in schizophrenia

Stefan Leucht, Ágota Barabássy, István Laszlovszky, Balázs Szatmári, K. Acsai, Erzsébet Szalai, Judit Harsányi, Willie Earley, György Németh

Research output: Article

Abstract

Understanding how rating scale improvement corresponds to a clinical impression in patients with negative symptoms of schizophrenia may help define the clinical relevance of change in this patient population. We conducted post hoc equipercentile linking analyses of Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) outcomes (e.g., PANSS-Factor Score for Negative Symptoms [FSNS]) with Clinical Global Impressions-Improvement (CGI-I) and -Severity (CGI-S) ratings on data from patients treated with cariprazine (n = 227) or risperidone (n = 229) in a clinical study evaluating negative symptoms in schizophrenia. Patients were prospectively selected for persistent, predominant negative symptoms of schizophrenia (PNS), and minimal positive/depressive/extrapyramidal symptoms. Linking results demonstrated that greater improvement on PANSS-derived measures corresponded to clinical impressions of greater improvement, as measured by the CGI-I, and less severe disease states, as measured by the CGI-S. For example, CGI-S scores of 1 (normal), 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 (severely ill) corresponded to PANSS-FSNS scores of 7, 13, 19, 24, 29, and 35, respectively. Likewise, CGI-I scores of minimally improved, much improved, and very much improved corresponded to a change from baseline in PANSS-FSNS scores of −27%, −49%, and −100%, respectively. These are important findings for the interpretation of the results of trials in patients with persistent negative symptoms.

Original languageEnglish
JournalNeuropsychopharmacology
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - jan. 1 2019

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Schizophrenia
Risperidone
Depression
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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Linking PANSS negative symptom scores with the Clinical Global Impressions Scale : understanding negative symptom scores in schizophrenia. / Leucht, Stefan; Barabássy, Ágota; Laszlovszky, István; Szatmári, Balázs; Acsai, K.; Szalai, Erzsébet; Harsányi, Judit; Earley, Willie; Németh, György.

In: Neuropsychopharmacology, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Article

Leucht, Stefan ; Barabássy, Ágota ; Laszlovszky, István ; Szatmári, Balázs ; Acsai, K. ; Szalai, Erzsébet ; Harsányi, Judit ; Earley, Willie ; Németh, György. / Linking PANSS negative symptom scores with the Clinical Global Impressions Scale : understanding negative symptom scores in schizophrenia. In: Neuropsychopharmacology. 2019.
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