Isotopes of Barium as a Chronometer for Supernova Dust Formation

Ulrich Ott, Thomas Stephan, Peter Hoppe, Michael R. Savina

Research output: Article

Abstract

Ejecta from the explosion of massive stars (core-collapse supernovae) make an important contribution to dust in the interstellar medium. However, dust formation around supernovae is not a simple process, with the formation of several components over time. In particular, the exact timing is a matter of debate. Here, we demonstrate that the isotopic composition of barium in supernova grains that survived in primitive meteorites constitutes a potential chronometer. For a subset of supernova silicon carbide grains (X1 grains), the Ba isotopes indicate that they formed at roughly the same time, and that, at this time, a substantial fraction of the freshly produced unstable 137Cs (half-life 30 yr) had already decayed into 137Ba. Application to the 137Cs/137Ba system of nucleosynthesis models that replicate the abundance patterns of stable neutron capture isotopes in these grains indicates a surprisingly late (∼20 yr) timescale for condensation, a conclusion that naturally rests on the reliability of these models.

Original languageEnglish
Article number128
JournalAstrophysical Journal
Volume885
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - nov. 10 2019

Fingerprint

chronometers
barium
supernovae
isotopes
dust
isotope
ejecta
meteorite
half life
silicon
condensation
explosion
isotopic composition
meteorites
massive stars
nuclear fusion
silicon carbides
set theory
timescale
explosions

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Astronomy and Astrophysics
  • Space and Planetary Science

Cite this

Isotopes of Barium as a Chronometer for Supernova Dust Formation. / Ott, Ulrich; Stephan, Thomas; Hoppe, Peter; Savina, Michael R.

In: Astrophysical Journal, Vol. 885, No. 2, 128, 10.11.2019.

Research output: Article

Ott, Ulrich ; Stephan, Thomas ; Hoppe, Peter ; Savina, Michael R. / Isotopes of Barium as a Chronometer for Supernova Dust Formation. In: Astrophysical Journal. 2019 ; Vol. 885, No. 2.
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