Intracisternal capsaicin

Selective degeneration of chemosensitive primary sensory afferents in the adult rat

Research output: Article

49 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The present study reports that intracisternal administration of capsaicin induces the selective degeneration of chemosensitive primary sensory afferents and results in a practically complete abolition of chemical pain sensitivity in the adult rat. This treatment, however, failed to affect neurogenic inflammation in the corresponding skin areas. Accordingly, intracisternal capsaicin induces merely the degeneration of the centrally directed axons of chemosensitive primary sensory neurones (CPSNs). To indicate their particular dual function, CPSNs are proposed to be termed secreto-sensory nociceptive neurones. It is suggested that these neurones, through the release of neurogenic factor(s) at their peripheral end, may effectively modulate the afferent input related to pain sensation at the level of sensory receptors.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)41-45
Number of pages5
JournalNeuroscience Letters
Volume27
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - nov. 18 1981

Fingerprint

Capsaicin
Sensory Receptor Cells
Neurogenic Inflammation
Pain
Nociceptors
Axons
Neurons
Skin
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

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N2 - The present study reports that intracisternal administration of capsaicin induces the selective degeneration of chemosensitive primary sensory afferents and results in a practically complete abolition of chemical pain sensitivity in the adult rat. This treatment, however, failed to affect neurogenic inflammation in the corresponding skin areas. Accordingly, intracisternal capsaicin induces merely the degeneration of the centrally directed axons of chemosensitive primary sensory neurones (CPSNs). To indicate their particular dual function, CPSNs are proposed to be termed secreto-sensory nociceptive neurones. It is suggested that these neurones, through the release of neurogenic factor(s) at their peripheral end, may effectively modulate the afferent input related to pain sensation at the level of sensory receptors.

AB - The present study reports that intracisternal administration of capsaicin induces the selective degeneration of chemosensitive primary sensory afferents and results in a practically complete abolition of chemical pain sensitivity in the adult rat. This treatment, however, failed to affect neurogenic inflammation in the corresponding skin areas. Accordingly, intracisternal capsaicin induces merely the degeneration of the centrally directed axons of chemosensitive primary sensory neurones (CPSNs). To indicate their particular dual function, CPSNs are proposed to be termed secreto-sensory nociceptive neurones. It is suggested that these neurones, through the release of neurogenic factor(s) at their peripheral end, may effectively modulate the afferent input related to pain sensation at the level of sensory receptors.

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