Ictal affective symptoms in temporal lobe epilepsy are related to gender and age

Vanda Toth, A. Fogarasi, Kazmer Karadi, N. Kovács, Alois Ebner, J. Janszky

Research output: Article

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: We systematically analyzed the video-recorded and patient-reported, as well as positive and negative ictal affective symptoms (IAS) in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Our aim was to assess (1) frequency, (2) gender effect, (3) lateralizing significance, (4) localizing value, and (5) prognostic significance in epilepsy surgery of IAS in patients with video-registered seizures. Methods: We reviewed ictal video recordings of 184 patients (99 women, aged 16-63). All patients had surgery for intractable TLE with video-recorded complex partial seizures (CPS) due to temporal lobe lesions visualized by high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Affective auras (AAs) were categorized into two groups: positive or negative. Results: We registered AAs in 18% of patients: positive in 3%, negative in 15%. We saw ictal affective behavior (IAB) in 22% of patients; 10% had positive, whereas 14% had negative IAB. Two patients had both positive and negative IAB. AAs showed an association with IAB in case of fear expression versus fear auras (p = 0.018). IAB, especially negative IAB, occurred more often in women than in men. Patients with negative IAB were younger than others. We could not demonstrate an association between IAS and the localization, lateralization, or hemispheric dominance. Surgical outcome did not associate with IAS. Discussion: Patient-reported and video-recorded negative - but not positive - affective signs are related to each other. Video-recorded negative AAs occur more often in women and young patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1126-1132
Number of pages7
JournalEpilepsia
Volume51
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - júl. 2010

Fingerprint

Affective Symptoms
Temporal Lobe Epilepsy
Stroke
Epilepsy
Fear
Seizures
Video Recording
Temporal Lobe
Magnetic Resonance Imaging

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neurology

Cite this

Ictal affective symptoms in temporal lobe epilepsy are related to gender and age. / Toth, Vanda; Fogarasi, A.; Karadi, Kazmer; Kovács, N.; Ebner, Alois; Janszky, J.

In: Epilepsia, Vol. 51, No. 7, 07.2010, p. 1126-1132.

Research output: Article

Toth, Vanda ; Fogarasi, A. ; Karadi, Kazmer ; Kovács, N. ; Ebner, Alois ; Janszky, J. / Ictal affective symptoms in temporal lobe epilepsy are related to gender and age. In: Epilepsia. 2010 ; Vol. 51, No. 7. pp. 1126-1132.
@article{ee5e170032134fee93842356865b7345,
title = "Ictal affective symptoms in temporal lobe epilepsy are related to gender and age",
abstract = "Purpose: We systematically analyzed the video-recorded and patient-reported, as well as positive and negative ictal affective symptoms (IAS) in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Our aim was to assess (1) frequency, (2) gender effect, (3) lateralizing significance, (4) localizing value, and (5) prognostic significance in epilepsy surgery of IAS in patients with video-registered seizures. Methods: We reviewed ictal video recordings of 184 patients (99 women, aged 16-63). All patients had surgery for intractable TLE with video-recorded complex partial seizures (CPS) due to temporal lobe lesions visualized by high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Affective auras (AAs) were categorized into two groups: positive or negative. Results: We registered AAs in 18{\%} of patients: positive in 3{\%}, negative in 15{\%}. We saw ictal affective behavior (IAB) in 22{\%} of patients; 10{\%} had positive, whereas 14{\%} had negative IAB. Two patients had both positive and negative IAB. AAs showed an association with IAB in case of fear expression versus fear auras (p = 0.018). IAB, especially negative IAB, occurred more often in women than in men. Patients with negative IAB were younger than others. We could not demonstrate an association between IAS and the localization, lateralization, or hemispheric dominance. Surgical outcome did not associate with IAS. Discussion: Patient-reported and video-recorded negative - but not positive - affective signs are related to each other. Video-recorded negative AAs occur more often in women and young patients.",
keywords = "Aging, Brain lateralization, Emotional signs, Gender differences, Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy",
author = "Vanda Toth and A. Fogarasi and Kazmer Karadi and N. Kov{\'a}cs and Alois Ebner and J. Janszky",
year = "2010",
month = "7",
doi = "10.1111/j.1528-1167.2009.02396.x",
language = "English",
volume = "51",
pages = "1126--1132",
journal = "Epilepsia",
issn = "0013-9580",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "7",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Ictal affective symptoms in temporal lobe epilepsy are related to gender and age

AU - Toth, Vanda

AU - Fogarasi, A.

AU - Karadi, Kazmer

AU - Kovács, N.

AU - Ebner, Alois

AU - Janszky, J.

PY - 2010/7

Y1 - 2010/7

N2 - Purpose: We systematically analyzed the video-recorded and patient-reported, as well as positive and negative ictal affective symptoms (IAS) in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Our aim was to assess (1) frequency, (2) gender effect, (3) lateralizing significance, (4) localizing value, and (5) prognostic significance in epilepsy surgery of IAS in patients with video-registered seizures. Methods: We reviewed ictal video recordings of 184 patients (99 women, aged 16-63). All patients had surgery for intractable TLE with video-recorded complex partial seizures (CPS) due to temporal lobe lesions visualized by high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Affective auras (AAs) were categorized into two groups: positive or negative. Results: We registered AAs in 18% of patients: positive in 3%, negative in 15%. We saw ictal affective behavior (IAB) in 22% of patients; 10% had positive, whereas 14% had negative IAB. Two patients had both positive and negative IAB. AAs showed an association with IAB in case of fear expression versus fear auras (p = 0.018). IAB, especially negative IAB, occurred more often in women than in men. Patients with negative IAB were younger than others. We could not demonstrate an association between IAS and the localization, lateralization, or hemispheric dominance. Surgical outcome did not associate with IAS. Discussion: Patient-reported and video-recorded negative - but not positive - affective signs are related to each other. Video-recorded negative AAs occur more often in women and young patients.

AB - Purpose: We systematically analyzed the video-recorded and patient-reported, as well as positive and negative ictal affective symptoms (IAS) in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Our aim was to assess (1) frequency, (2) gender effect, (3) lateralizing significance, (4) localizing value, and (5) prognostic significance in epilepsy surgery of IAS in patients with video-registered seizures. Methods: We reviewed ictal video recordings of 184 patients (99 women, aged 16-63). All patients had surgery for intractable TLE with video-recorded complex partial seizures (CPS) due to temporal lobe lesions visualized by high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Affective auras (AAs) were categorized into two groups: positive or negative. Results: We registered AAs in 18% of patients: positive in 3%, negative in 15%. We saw ictal affective behavior (IAB) in 22% of patients; 10% had positive, whereas 14% had negative IAB. Two patients had both positive and negative IAB. AAs showed an association with IAB in case of fear expression versus fear auras (p = 0.018). IAB, especially negative IAB, occurred more often in women than in men. Patients with negative IAB were younger than others. We could not demonstrate an association between IAS and the localization, lateralization, or hemispheric dominance. Surgical outcome did not associate with IAS. Discussion: Patient-reported and video-recorded negative - but not positive - affective signs are related to each other. Video-recorded negative AAs occur more often in women and young patients.

KW - Aging

KW - Brain lateralization

KW - Emotional signs

KW - Gender differences

KW - Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=77954526111&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=77954526111&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/j.1528-1167.2009.02396.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1528-1167.2009.02396.x

M3 - Article

C2 - 19889014

AN - SCOPUS:77954526111

VL - 51

SP - 1126

EP - 1132

JO - Epilepsia

JF - Epilepsia

SN - 0013-9580

IS - 7

ER -