Guide-lines to the treatment of patients with X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets.

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Abstract

The causes of the development of nephrocalcinosis in familial hypophosphatemic rickets (FHR) are reviewed. The treatment combines vitamin D or 1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D and oral phosphate supplementation. Hypercalcaemia and hypercalciuria were thought to cause the renal calcification. On the basis of the data of eighteen patients with familiar hypophosphatemic rickets we have found that the main difference between the treatment of patients having nephrocalcinosis and those with normal renal morphology consisted in the dose of oral phosphate intake. Patients with nephrocalcinosis received significantly higher doses of oral phosphate (130 mg/kg/day versus 70 mg/kg/day, p <0.01). Correspondingly, their urinary phosphate excretion was also significantly higher (p <0.01). There was no difference between the two groups with respect of the doses of vitamin D and urinary calcium excretion. It can be concluded, that high concentrations of urinary phosphate can lead to nephrocalcinosis even if urinary calcium concentration is normal. In order to prevent nephrocalcinosis in patients with X-linked hypophosphatemia, the following guide-lines could be recommended: 1) urinary calcium excretion should be kept lower, than the usually allowed <4 mg/kg/day; 2) oral phosphate supplementation should not exceed 100 mg/kg/day, 3) patients should be encouraged to drink large amounts of water, 4) regular ultrasound controls should be part of the routine follow-up.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)147-151
Number of pages5
JournalActa bio-medica de L'Ateneo parmense : organo della Società di medicina e scienze naturali di Parma
Volume66
Issue number3-4
Publication statusPublished - 1995

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Familial Hypophosphatemic Rickets
Nephrocalcinosis
Phosphates
Calcium
Vitamin D
Hypophosphatemic Rickets
Kidney
Therapeutics
Hypercalciuria
Hypercalcemia
Water

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

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abstract = "The causes of the development of nephrocalcinosis in familial hypophosphatemic rickets (FHR) are reviewed. The treatment combines vitamin D or 1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D and oral phosphate supplementation. Hypercalcaemia and hypercalciuria were thought to cause the renal calcification. On the basis of the data of eighteen patients with familiar hypophosphatemic rickets we have found that the main difference between the treatment of patients having nephrocalcinosis and those with normal renal morphology consisted in the dose of oral phosphate intake. Patients with nephrocalcinosis received significantly higher doses of oral phosphate (130 mg/kg/day versus 70 mg/kg/day, p <0.01). Correspondingly, their urinary phosphate excretion was also significantly higher (p <0.01). There was no difference between the two groups with respect of the doses of vitamin D and urinary calcium excretion. It can be concluded, that high concentrations of urinary phosphate can lead to nephrocalcinosis even if urinary calcium concentration is normal. In order to prevent nephrocalcinosis in patients with X-linked hypophosphatemia, the following guide-lines could be recommended: 1) urinary calcium excretion should be kept lower, than the usually allowed <4 mg/kg/day; 2) oral phosphate supplementation should not exceed 100 mg/kg/day, 3) patients should be encouraged to drink large amounts of water, 4) regular ultrasound controls should be part of the routine follow-up.",
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