Genetic factors exist behind the high prevalence of reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in the Roma population

Péter Pikó, Szilvia Fiatal, Zsigmond Kósa, J. Sándor, R. Ádány

Research output: Article

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Abstract

Background and aims Previous findings showed that reduced plasma high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels are more frequent in all age groups of the Hungarian Roma compared to the general population. It suggests that genetic factors may exist behind this phenomenon. Our present study was designed to test this hypothesis, i.e., to define whether genetic factors contribute to the higher prevalence of reduced HDL-C among Roma. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (N = 21) contributing to the variation in plasma HDL-C concentrations were analysed in the Hungarian Roma (N = 646) and general (N = 1542) populations. Methods Genetic risk scores, unweighted (GRS) and weighted (wGRS), were computed and compared. Associations between the GRSs and the prevalence of reduced HDL-C levels were analysed. Results The GRS and wGRS were significantly higher in the Roma compared to the general population (GRS: 22.2 ± 3.2 vs. 21.5 ± 3.3; wGRS: 0.57 ± 0.1 vs. 0.53 ± 0.1; p<0.001). One half per cent of Roma subjects were in the bottom fifth of the wGRS (wGRS≤ 0.3) compared with 1.8% of those in the general population (p=0.025), while 5% of the Roma subjects were in the top fifth of the wGRS (wGRS≥ 0.75) compared with 2.6% of those in the general population (p=0.004). The GRS showed similar correlation with reduced plasma HDL-C levels in the two populations, whilst the wGRS showed stronger correlation with the trait among Roma after controlling for confounders. Conclusions These results strongly suggest that genetic factors contribute to the higher prevalence of reduced HDL-C levels among Roma, so interventions aiming to improve Roma health status need to consider their increased genetic susceptibility.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)119-126
Number of pages8
JournalAtherosclerosis
Volume263
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - aug. 1 2017

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Roma
HDL Cholesterol
Population
Population Genetics
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Health Status
Single Nucleotide Polymorphism
Age Groups

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Genetic factors exist behind the high prevalence of reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in the Roma population. / Pikó, Péter; Fiatal, Szilvia; Kósa, Zsigmond; Sándor, J.; Ádány, R.

In: Atherosclerosis, Vol. 263, 01.08.2017, p. 119-126.

Research output: Article

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abstract = "Background and aims Previous findings showed that reduced plasma high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels are more frequent in all age groups of the Hungarian Roma compared to the general population. It suggests that genetic factors may exist behind this phenomenon. Our present study was designed to test this hypothesis, i.e., to define whether genetic factors contribute to the higher prevalence of reduced HDL-C among Roma. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (N = 21) contributing to the variation in plasma HDL-C concentrations were analysed in the Hungarian Roma (N = 646) and general (N = 1542) populations. Methods Genetic risk scores, unweighted (GRS) and weighted (wGRS), were computed and compared. Associations between the GRSs and the prevalence of reduced HDL-C levels were analysed. Results The GRS and wGRS were significantly higher in the Roma compared to the general population (GRS: 22.2 ± 3.2 vs. 21.5 ± 3.3; wGRS: 0.57 ± 0.1 vs. 0.53 ± 0.1; p<0.001). One half per cent of Roma subjects were in the bottom fifth of the wGRS (wGRS≤ 0.3) compared with 1.8{\%} of those in the general population (p=0.025), while 5{\%} of the Roma subjects were in the top fifth of the wGRS (wGRS≥ 0.75) compared with 2.6{\%} of those in the general population (p=0.004). The GRS showed similar correlation with reduced plasma HDL-C levels in the two populations, whilst the wGRS showed stronger correlation with the trait among Roma after controlling for confounders. Conclusions These results strongly suggest that genetic factors contribute to the higher prevalence of reduced HDL-C levels among Roma, so interventions aiming to improve Roma health status need to consider their increased genetic susceptibility.",
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AU - Pikó, Péter

AU - Fiatal, Szilvia

AU - Kósa, Zsigmond

AU - Sándor, J.

AU - Ádány, R.

PY - 2017/8/1

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N2 - Background and aims Previous findings showed that reduced plasma high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels are more frequent in all age groups of the Hungarian Roma compared to the general population. It suggests that genetic factors may exist behind this phenomenon. Our present study was designed to test this hypothesis, i.e., to define whether genetic factors contribute to the higher prevalence of reduced HDL-C among Roma. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (N = 21) contributing to the variation in plasma HDL-C concentrations were analysed in the Hungarian Roma (N = 646) and general (N = 1542) populations. Methods Genetic risk scores, unweighted (GRS) and weighted (wGRS), were computed and compared. Associations between the GRSs and the prevalence of reduced HDL-C levels were analysed. Results The GRS and wGRS were significantly higher in the Roma compared to the general population (GRS: 22.2 ± 3.2 vs. 21.5 ± 3.3; wGRS: 0.57 ± 0.1 vs. 0.53 ± 0.1; p<0.001). One half per cent of Roma subjects were in the bottom fifth of the wGRS (wGRS≤ 0.3) compared with 1.8% of those in the general population (p=0.025), while 5% of the Roma subjects were in the top fifth of the wGRS (wGRS≥ 0.75) compared with 2.6% of those in the general population (p=0.004). The GRS showed similar correlation with reduced plasma HDL-C levels in the two populations, whilst the wGRS showed stronger correlation with the trait among Roma after controlling for confounders. Conclusions These results strongly suggest that genetic factors contribute to the higher prevalence of reduced HDL-C levels among Roma, so interventions aiming to improve Roma health status need to consider their increased genetic susceptibility.

AB - Background and aims Previous findings showed that reduced plasma high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels are more frequent in all age groups of the Hungarian Roma compared to the general population. It suggests that genetic factors may exist behind this phenomenon. Our present study was designed to test this hypothesis, i.e., to define whether genetic factors contribute to the higher prevalence of reduced HDL-C among Roma. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (N = 21) contributing to the variation in plasma HDL-C concentrations were analysed in the Hungarian Roma (N = 646) and general (N = 1542) populations. Methods Genetic risk scores, unweighted (GRS) and weighted (wGRS), were computed and compared. Associations between the GRSs and the prevalence of reduced HDL-C levels were analysed. Results The GRS and wGRS were significantly higher in the Roma compared to the general population (GRS: 22.2 ± 3.2 vs. 21.5 ± 3.3; wGRS: 0.57 ± 0.1 vs. 0.53 ± 0.1; p<0.001). One half per cent of Roma subjects were in the bottom fifth of the wGRS (wGRS≤ 0.3) compared with 1.8% of those in the general population (p=0.025), while 5% of the Roma subjects were in the top fifth of the wGRS (wGRS≥ 0.75) compared with 2.6% of those in the general population (p=0.004). The GRS showed similar correlation with reduced plasma HDL-C levels in the two populations, whilst the wGRS showed stronger correlation with the trait among Roma after controlling for confounders. Conclusions These results strongly suggest that genetic factors contribute to the higher prevalence of reduced HDL-C levels among Roma, so interventions aiming to improve Roma health status need to consider their increased genetic susceptibility.

KW - Genetic risk score

KW - Genetic susceptibility

KW - High-density lipoprotein cholesterol

KW - Roma population

KW - Single nucleotide polymorphism

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