Frontotemporal dementia--Part II. Differential diagnosis, genetics, molecular pathomechanism and pathology.

Vasilis Galariotis, Nikoletta Bódi, Z. Janka, J. Kálmán

Research output: Article

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This is a comprehensive paper in three parts covering history, prevalence, clinical forms, differential diagnosis, genetics, molecular pathomechanism, pathology, clinical diagnosis and treatment of frontotemporal dementia (FTD). The second part focuses on the differential diagnosis, genetics, molecular pathomechanism and pathology. The clinical diagnosis of frontotemporal dementia is based on the presence of a prominent disturbance of the executive function and of frontal lobe syndrome or a progressive aphasic syndrome without severe global cognitive impairment. Of other dementias, it is primarily Alzheimer's disease that it should be differentiated from, but other psychiatric disorders must also be ruled out. The disease has familial and sporadic forms. Recent identification of mutations in the gene encoding the microtubule-associated tau protein in the inherited frontotemporal dementia and parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 (FTDP-17) has demonstrated that various tau dysfunctions can lead to neurodegeneration. Tau gene mutations have varied effects on the biology and function of the protein. This heterogeneous pathomechanism explains the wide range of clinical and neuropathological features observed in the FTDP-17. Tau and ubiquitin antibodies can be detected by sensitive immunohistochemical methods. The diagnosis of FTD should be based on neuropathological examination, and this is also the only method by which it can be definitely differentiated from other types of dementias.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)220-224
Number of pages5
JournalIdeggyógyászati szemle
Volume58
Issue number7-8
Publication statusPublished - júl. 20 2005

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Frontotemporal Dementia
Molecular Pathology
Differential Diagnosis
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 17
Parkinsonian Disorders
Dementia
tau Proteins
Mutation
Microtubule-Associated Proteins
Executive Function
Frontal Lobe
Ubiquitin
Genes
Psychiatry
Alzheimer Disease
History
Antibodies
Proteins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Frontotemporal dementia--Part II. Differential diagnosis, genetics, molecular pathomechanism and pathology. / Galariotis, Vasilis; Bódi, Nikoletta; Janka, Z.; Kálmán, J.

In: Ideggyógyászati szemle, Vol. 58, No. 7-8, 20.07.2005, p. 220-224.

Research output: Article

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