Energy expenditure by heart rate in children: An evaluation of calibration techniques

B. Livingstone, P. J. Robson, M. Totton

Research output: Article

48 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To evaluate the impact of applying seven calibration equations (CE) in the estimation of free-living total energy expenditure (TEE) over 2-3 d in seven boys (mean ± SD age 9.4 ± 0.4 yr) by the Flex heart rate (HR) method. Methods: HR and oxygen consumption were measured simultaneously for eight activities (lying, sitting, standing, arm-reaching exercise, a stooping-and-twisting exercise, stepping, treadmill walking/running, and cycle ergometry) carried out in sequence. CE were derived from various combinations of activities. Flex HRs were identified for each CE. Results: There were no significant differences in TEE estimates [range (mean ± SD); 6.65 ± 0.72 to 7.27. ± 0.89 MJ·d-1] derived from any of the CE. Mean daytime HR ranged from 86 ± 4 to 122 ± 15 beats·min-1, and 82-98% of recorded daytime HR was ≤ 140 beats·min-1 As a result, within-subject CV in TEE from each of the CE ranged from 2.2% to 8.9%. Mean between-subject Flex HR ranged from 94 ± 8 to 111 ± 8 beats·min-1. No significant differences were observed in corresponding TEE estimates. However, mean activity energy expenditure (AEE) ranged from 2.10 ± 1.18 MJ·d-1 (based on Flex HR 111 ± 8 beats·min-1) to 3.55 ± 1.44 MJ·d-1 (based on Flex HR 94 ± 8 beats·min-1; NS). The corresponding estimates of resting energy expenditure (REE) were 1.89 ± 0.82 MJ·d-1 (Flex HR 111 ± 8 beats·min-1) and 1.05 ± 0.60 MJ·d-1 (Flex HR 94 ± 8 beats·min-1). Only the differences between the minimum and maximum estimates of REE were significant (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Unduly lengthy and complex calibration procedures for the estimation of Flex HR TEE may not be justified in most cases, particularly in sedentary children.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1513-1519
Number of pages7
JournalMedicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
Volume32
Issue number8
Publication statusPublished - 2000

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Energy Metabolism
Calibration
Heart Rate
Exercise
Ergometry
Oxygen Consumption
Running
Walking

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

@article{5bf6f3b9d9eb4c19a197a8ca68abfffb,
title = "Energy expenditure by heart rate in children: An evaluation of calibration techniques",
abstract = "Purpose: To evaluate the impact of applying seven calibration equations (CE) in the estimation of free-living total energy expenditure (TEE) over 2-3 d in seven boys (mean ± SD age 9.4 ± 0.4 yr) by the Flex heart rate (HR) method. Methods: HR and oxygen consumption were measured simultaneously for eight activities (lying, sitting, standing, arm-reaching exercise, a stooping-and-twisting exercise, stepping, treadmill walking/running, and cycle ergometry) carried out in sequence. CE were derived from various combinations of activities. Flex HRs were identified for each CE. Results: There were no significant differences in TEE estimates [range (mean ± SD); 6.65 ± 0.72 to 7.27. ± 0.89 MJ·d-1] derived from any of the CE. Mean daytime HR ranged from 86 ± 4 to 122 ± 15 beats·min-1, and 82-98{\%} of recorded daytime HR was ≤ 140 beats·min-1 As a result, within-subject CV in TEE from each of the CE ranged from 2.2{\%} to 8.9{\%}. Mean between-subject Flex HR ranged from 94 ± 8 to 111 ± 8 beats·min-1. No significant differences were observed in corresponding TEE estimates. However, mean activity energy expenditure (AEE) ranged from 2.10 ± 1.18 MJ·d-1 (based on Flex HR 111 ± 8 beats·min-1) to 3.55 ± 1.44 MJ·d-1 (based on Flex HR 94 ± 8 beats·min-1; NS). The corresponding estimates of resting energy expenditure (REE) were 1.89 ± 0.82 MJ·d-1 (Flex HR 111 ± 8 beats·min-1) and 1.05 ± 0.60 MJ·d-1 (Flex HR 94 ± 8 beats·min-1). Only the differences between the minimum and maximum estimates of REE were significant (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Unduly lengthy and complex calibration procedures for the estimation of Flex HR TEE may not be justified in most cases, particularly in sedentary children.",
keywords = "Free-living children, Heart rate monitoring, Oxygen consumption, Regression",
author = "B. Livingstone and Robson, {P. J.} and M. Totton",
year = "2000",
language = "English",
volume = "32",
pages = "1513--1519",
journal = "Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise",
issn = "0195-9131",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "8",

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TY - JOUR

T1 - Energy expenditure by heart rate in children

T2 - An evaluation of calibration techniques

AU - Livingstone, B.

AU - Robson, P. J.

AU - Totton, M.

PY - 2000

Y1 - 2000

N2 - Purpose: To evaluate the impact of applying seven calibration equations (CE) in the estimation of free-living total energy expenditure (TEE) over 2-3 d in seven boys (mean ± SD age 9.4 ± 0.4 yr) by the Flex heart rate (HR) method. Methods: HR and oxygen consumption were measured simultaneously for eight activities (lying, sitting, standing, arm-reaching exercise, a stooping-and-twisting exercise, stepping, treadmill walking/running, and cycle ergometry) carried out in sequence. CE were derived from various combinations of activities. Flex HRs were identified for each CE. Results: There were no significant differences in TEE estimates [range (mean ± SD); 6.65 ± 0.72 to 7.27. ± 0.89 MJ·d-1] derived from any of the CE. Mean daytime HR ranged from 86 ± 4 to 122 ± 15 beats·min-1, and 82-98% of recorded daytime HR was ≤ 140 beats·min-1 As a result, within-subject CV in TEE from each of the CE ranged from 2.2% to 8.9%. Mean between-subject Flex HR ranged from 94 ± 8 to 111 ± 8 beats·min-1. No significant differences were observed in corresponding TEE estimates. However, mean activity energy expenditure (AEE) ranged from 2.10 ± 1.18 MJ·d-1 (based on Flex HR 111 ± 8 beats·min-1) to 3.55 ± 1.44 MJ·d-1 (based on Flex HR 94 ± 8 beats·min-1; NS). The corresponding estimates of resting energy expenditure (REE) were 1.89 ± 0.82 MJ·d-1 (Flex HR 111 ± 8 beats·min-1) and 1.05 ± 0.60 MJ·d-1 (Flex HR 94 ± 8 beats·min-1). Only the differences between the minimum and maximum estimates of REE were significant (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Unduly lengthy and complex calibration procedures for the estimation of Flex HR TEE may not be justified in most cases, particularly in sedentary children.

AB - Purpose: To evaluate the impact of applying seven calibration equations (CE) in the estimation of free-living total energy expenditure (TEE) over 2-3 d in seven boys (mean ± SD age 9.4 ± 0.4 yr) by the Flex heart rate (HR) method. Methods: HR and oxygen consumption were measured simultaneously for eight activities (lying, sitting, standing, arm-reaching exercise, a stooping-and-twisting exercise, stepping, treadmill walking/running, and cycle ergometry) carried out in sequence. CE were derived from various combinations of activities. Flex HRs were identified for each CE. Results: There were no significant differences in TEE estimates [range (mean ± SD); 6.65 ± 0.72 to 7.27. ± 0.89 MJ·d-1] derived from any of the CE. Mean daytime HR ranged from 86 ± 4 to 122 ± 15 beats·min-1, and 82-98% of recorded daytime HR was ≤ 140 beats·min-1 As a result, within-subject CV in TEE from each of the CE ranged from 2.2% to 8.9%. Mean between-subject Flex HR ranged from 94 ± 8 to 111 ± 8 beats·min-1. No significant differences were observed in corresponding TEE estimates. However, mean activity energy expenditure (AEE) ranged from 2.10 ± 1.18 MJ·d-1 (based on Flex HR 111 ± 8 beats·min-1) to 3.55 ± 1.44 MJ·d-1 (based on Flex HR 94 ± 8 beats·min-1; NS). The corresponding estimates of resting energy expenditure (REE) were 1.89 ± 0.82 MJ·d-1 (Flex HR 111 ± 8 beats·min-1) and 1.05 ± 0.60 MJ·d-1 (Flex HR 94 ± 8 beats·min-1). Only the differences between the minimum and maximum estimates of REE were significant (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Unduly lengthy and complex calibration procedures for the estimation of Flex HR TEE may not be justified in most cases, particularly in sedentary children.

KW - Free-living children

KW - Heart rate monitoring

KW - Oxygen consumption

KW - Regression

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