Dual tropism of HIV-1 IIIB for chimpanzee lymphocytes and monocytes

M. M. Eibl, Z. Kupcu, J. W. Mannhalter, G. Eder, Z. Schaff

Research output: Article

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In humans, macrophages serve as a major reservoir of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) in the infected host and may play a role in the pathogenesis of the disease. In HIV-1-infected chimpanzees, however, virus could not be recovered from cells of the monocyte/macrophage lineage, leaving the question of macrophage tropism of HIV-1 in this species unresolved. The data reported that HIV-1 IIIB shows dual tropism and is infectious for both chimpanzee monocytes and lymphocytes in vitro. Viral replication in chimpanzee monocytes was clearly demonstrated by infection of allogeneic phytohemagglutinin (PHA) blasts in vitro and by electron microscopy (EM). EM revealed HIV particles associated with 10-15% of the HIV-1 IIIB-infected chimpanzee monocytes. Viral particles budding from the monocyte surface in the typical crescent form were noted as well. This is in contrast to the human situation, where monocytotropic HIV strains preferentially bud into and accumulate in cytoplasmic vacuoles. These results indicate that both lymphocytes and cells of the monocyte/macrophage lineage replicate virus in the chimpanzee; the cell tropism of viral strains, however, is different in chimpanzees and humans.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)69-75
Number of pages7
JournalAIDS Research and Human Retroviruses
Volume8
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 1992

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Tropism
Pan troglodytes
HIV-1
Monocytes
Lymphocytes
Macrophages
Electron Microscopy
Viral Tropism
HIV
Viruses
Phytohemagglutinins
Vacuoles
Virion
Infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Virology

Cite this

Dual tropism of HIV-1 IIIB for chimpanzee lymphocytes and monocytes. / Eibl, M. M.; Kupcu, Z.; Mannhalter, J. W.; Eder, G.; Schaff, Z.

In: AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses, Vol. 8, No. 1, 1992, p. 69-75.

Research output: Article

Eibl, MM, Kupcu, Z, Mannhalter, JW, Eder, G & Schaff, Z 1992, 'Dual tropism of HIV-1 IIIB for chimpanzee lymphocytes and monocytes', AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses, vol. 8, no. 1, pp. 69-75.
Eibl, M. M. ; Kupcu, Z. ; Mannhalter, J. W. ; Eder, G. ; Schaff, Z. / Dual tropism of HIV-1 IIIB for chimpanzee lymphocytes and monocytes. In: AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses. 1992 ; Vol. 8, No. 1. pp. 69-75.
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AB - In humans, macrophages serve as a major reservoir of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) in the infected host and may play a role in the pathogenesis of the disease. In HIV-1-infected chimpanzees, however, virus could not be recovered from cells of the monocyte/macrophage lineage, leaving the question of macrophage tropism of HIV-1 in this species unresolved. The data reported that HIV-1 IIIB shows dual tropism and is infectious for both chimpanzee monocytes and lymphocytes in vitro. Viral replication in chimpanzee monocytes was clearly demonstrated by infection of allogeneic phytohemagglutinin (PHA) blasts in vitro and by electron microscopy (EM). EM revealed HIV particles associated with 10-15% of the HIV-1 IIIB-infected chimpanzee monocytes. Viral particles budding from the monocyte surface in the typical crescent form were noted as well. This is in contrast to the human situation, where monocytotropic HIV strains preferentially bud into and accumulate in cytoplasmic vacuoles. These results indicate that both lymphocytes and cells of the monocyte/macrophage lineage replicate virus in the chimpanzee; the cell tropism of viral strains, however, is different in chimpanzees and humans.

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