Development of cerebral cortex in prematurely born infants: Cell proliferation, differentiation, and maturation of neurons and myelination in the archi-and neocortex

Research output: Chapter

Abstract

Increased survival of prematurely born infants is a major achievement of contemporary perinatal and neonatal medicine. However, follow-up studies have shown that many of these children exhibit impaired development including short-term morbidity and long-term physical and mental disability. Many prematurely born children, even without perinatal complications, display cognitive and educational difficulties, while the severity of these difficulties correlates with the time of birth. The development of cerebral cortex involves a highly organized, elaborate, and long-lasting series of events which are not completed by the time of birth. Indeed, many developmental events continue after the 40th postconceptual week, which explains the extended morphological, behavioral, and cognitive development of children. This chapter reviews normal cerebral cortical development and morphological evidence of cortical maturation in preterm and full-term infants. Aspects of postnatal cortical development, including cell proliferation and maturation of neurons, myelination of the temporal archi- and neocortex cortex, are discussed and compared in preterm infants and age-matched, full-term controls. A detailed overview is given of the rate of postnatal neuronal proliferation in the human dentate gyrus after premature birth as well as about the dendritic and axonal maturation of archi- and neocortical neurons. The perinatal disappearance of predominantly prenatal cell types (e.g., Cajal-Retzius cells) in preterms and the development of cortical convolutions are described. Finally, myelination of cerebral cortex in prematurely born infants is compared to full-term controls.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationHandbook of Growth and Growth Monitoring in Health and Disease
PublisherSpringer New York
Pages523-541
Number of pages19
ISBN (Electronic)9781441917959
ISBN (Print)9781441917942
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - jan. 1 2012

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Neocortex
Cerebral Cortex
Cell Differentiation
Cell Proliferation
Neurons
Parturition
Dentate Gyrus
Premature Birth
Child Development
Premature Infants
Medicine
Morbidity
Survival

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

Development of cerebral cortex in prematurely born infants : Cell proliferation, differentiation, and maturation of neurons and myelination in the archi-and neocortex. / Ábrahám, Hajnalka.

Handbook of Growth and Growth Monitoring in Health and Disease. Springer New York, 2012. p. 523-541.

Research output: Chapter

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