Konyhasók káliumtartalmának vizsgálata

Dávid Andrási, Berény András Mátyás, B. Kovács

Research output: Article

Abstract

In the last decades increased interest has been evolved from the point of consumers about food macro- and micro-nutrients. This increased attention sometimes results drawbacks since misbeliefs rises by some enthusiastic but unqualified people’s misunderstanding. These misbeliefs are usually propagated via internet. A few years ago a rumor had spread on different websites that commercial table salts contain more or less (20-60%) potassium-chloride behalf sodium chloride.

Our aim was to clarify that error. For this purpose twenty-three commercial available table salts were analyzed for potassium by an atomic absorption spectrometer (Carl Zeiss AAS5, Analytik Jena, Németország) in emission mode. Only in one sample could we measure higher potassium concentration (6.17±0.61 g/kg), but it can be explained by the fact that in that case it was fortified with KCl and KF. Two more salts had potassium level more than 1 g/kg; all the other examined table salt had less potassium than 1 g/kg. From the results it could be concluded that there is no difference between sea salts and mined salts or between “table” and “vacuum” grade salts in point of potassium; within a single category potassium concentrations varied broadly.

In conclusion potassium levels ranged between 0,003-0,616% expressed in potassium chloride, which is far from the mentioned 20-60%, so the concerns about adulteration of table salt, namely sodium chloride with potassium chloride is unnecessary.

Original languageHungarian
Pages (from-to)163-170
Number of pages8
JournalElelmiszervizsgalati Kozlemenyek
Volume59
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - 2013

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Dietary Sodium Chloride
Potassium
potassium
Potassium Chloride
potassium chloride
Salts
salts
Sodium Chloride
Food
sodium chloride
adulterated products
nutrients
Vacuum
table salt
spectrometers
Oceans and Seas
Internet

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science

Cite this

Konyhasók káliumtartalmának vizsgálata. / Andrási, Dávid; Mátyás, Berény András; Kovács, B.

In: Elelmiszervizsgalati Kozlemenyek, Vol. 59, No. 4, 2013, p. 163-170.

Research output: Article

Andrási, D, Mátyás, BA & Kovács, B 2013, 'Konyhasók káliumtartalmának vizsgálata', Elelmiszervizsgalati Kozlemenyek, vol. 59, no. 4, pp. 163-170.
Andrási, Dávid ; Mátyás, Berény András ; Kovács, B. / Konyhasók káliumtartalmának vizsgálata. In: Elelmiszervizsgalati Kozlemenyek. 2013 ; Vol. 59, No. 4. pp. 163-170.
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