Detection of enteric viruses in Hungarian surface waters: First steps towards environmental surveillance

Anita Kern, Mihaly Kadar, Katalin Szomor, G. Berencsi, Beatrix Kapusinszky, Marta Vargha

Research output: Article

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Waterborne viruses infect the human population through the consumption of contaminated drinking water and by direct contact with polluted surface water during recreational activity. Although water related viral outbreaks are a major public health concern, virus detection is not a part of the water quality monitoring scheme, mainly due to the absence of routine analysis methods. In the present study, we implemented various approaches for water concentration and virus detection, and tested on Hungarian surface water samples. Eighty samples were collected from 16 sites in Hungary. Samples were concentrated by glass wool and membrane filtration. Human adenoviruses were detected by conventional and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods in 56% (45/80) of the samples; viral titers ranged from 8.60 × 101 to 3.91 × 104 genome copies per liter. Noroviruses and enteroviruses were detected in 30% (24/80) and 13% (10/80) of samples, respectively, by reverse transcription-PCR assays. Results indicate a high prevalence of viral human pathogens in surface waters, suggesting the necessity of a detailed survey focusing on the quality of natural bathing waters and drinking water sources.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)772-782
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Water and Health
Volume11
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

Fingerprint

Enterovirus
Environmental Monitoring
virus
surface water
polymerase chain reaction
Water
drinking water
bathing water
recreational activity
wool
Viruses
Drinking Water
public health
genome
pathogen
glass
assay
membrane
water quality
Norovirus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Water Science and Technology
  • Waste Management and Disposal
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Detection of enteric viruses in Hungarian surface waters : First steps towards environmental surveillance. / Kern, Anita; Kadar, Mihaly; Szomor, Katalin; Berencsi, G.; Kapusinszky, Beatrix; Vargha, Marta.

In: Journal of Water and Health, Vol. 11, No. 4, 2013, p. 772-782.

Research output: Article

Kern, Anita ; Kadar, Mihaly ; Szomor, Katalin ; Berencsi, G. ; Kapusinszky, Beatrix ; Vargha, Marta. / Detection of enteric viruses in Hungarian surface waters : First steps towards environmental surveillance. In: Journal of Water and Health. 2013 ; Vol. 11, No. 4. pp. 772-782.
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