Decrease of morphine-induced prolactin release by a procedure causing prolonged stress

M. Fekete, B. Kanyicska, T. Szentendrei

Research output: Article

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The effects of morphine and fentanyl on plasma prolactin levels in rats have been measured. It was found that a prolonged immobilization stressful procedure for 5 h inhibited the response to morphine and fentanyl to increase prolactin secretion, but did not influence the increase in plasma prolactin caused by haloperidol. The injection of a large dose of cortisol (25 mg/kg, s.c.) also evoked an inhibition of morphine-induced prolactin release. The inhibition was maximal 24 h after the administration of the glucocorticoid. These results indicate that stress may induce prolonged alteration in endogenous opioid-mediated neuromodulation via a prolonged release of glucocorticoids.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)169-172
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Endocrinology
Volume101
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 1984

Fingerprint

Prolactin
Morphine
Fentanyl
Glucocorticoids
Haloperidol
Immobilization
Opioid Analgesics
Hydrocortisone
Injections

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology

Cite this

Decrease of morphine-induced prolactin release by a procedure causing prolonged stress. / Fekete, M.; Kanyicska, B.; Szentendrei, T.

In: Journal of Endocrinology, Vol. 101, No. 2, 1984, p. 169-172.

Research output: Article

Fekete, M. ; Kanyicska, B. ; Szentendrei, T. / Decrease of morphine-induced prolactin release by a procedure causing prolonged stress. In: Journal of Endocrinology. 1984 ; Vol. 101, No. 2. pp. 169-172.
@article{c8bb7da4e49f4d67af5d409ca0dd60dc,
title = "Decrease of morphine-induced prolactin release by a procedure causing prolonged stress",
abstract = "The effects of morphine and fentanyl on plasma prolactin levels in rats have been measured. It was found that a prolonged immobilization stressful procedure for 5 h inhibited the response to morphine and fentanyl to increase prolactin secretion, but did not influence the increase in plasma prolactin caused by haloperidol. The injection of a large dose of cortisol (25 mg/kg, s.c.) also evoked an inhibition of morphine-induced prolactin release. The inhibition was maximal 24 h after the administration of the glucocorticoid. These results indicate that stress may induce prolonged alteration in endogenous opioid-mediated neuromodulation via a prolonged release of glucocorticoids.",
author = "M. Fekete and B. Kanyicska and T. Szentendrei",
year = "1984",
language = "English",
volume = "101",
pages = "169--172",
journal = "Journal of Endocrinology",
issn = "0022-0795",
publisher = "Society for Endocrinology",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Decrease of morphine-induced prolactin release by a procedure causing prolonged stress

AU - Fekete, M.

AU - Kanyicska, B.

AU - Szentendrei, T.

PY - 1984

Y1 - 1984

N2 - The effects of morphine and fentanyl on plasma prolactin levels in rats have been measured. It was found that a prolonged immobilization stressful procedure for 5 h inhibited the response to morphine and fentanyl to increase prolactin secretion, but did not influence the increase in plasma prolactin caused by haloperidol. The injection of a large dose of cortisol (25 mg/kg, s.c.) also evoked an inhibition of morphine-induced prolactin release. The inhibition was maximal 24 h after the administration of the glucocorticoid. These results indicate that stress may induce prolonged alteration in endogenous opioid-mediated neuromodulation via a prolonged release of glucocorticoids.

AB - The effects of morphine and fentanyl on plasma prolactin levels in rats have been measured. It was found that a prolonged immobilization stressful procedure for 5 h inhibited the response to morphine and fentanyl to increase prolactin secretion, but did not influence the increase in plasma prolactin caused by haloperidol. The injection of a large dose of cortisol (25 mg/kg, s.c.) also evoked an inhibition of morphine-induced prolactin release. The inhibition was maximal 24 h after the administration of the glucocorticoid. These results indicate that stress may induce prolonged alteration in endogenous opioid-mediated neuromodulation via a prolonged release of glucocorticoids.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0021233620&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0021233620&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 6716033

AN - SCOPUS:0021233620

VL - 101

SP - 169

EP - 172

JO - Journal of Endocrinology

JF - Journal of Endocrinology

SN - 0022-0795

IS - 2

ER -