Cystoid macular edema related to cataract surgery and topical prostaglandin analogs: Mechanism, diagnosis, and management

Gábor Holló, Tin Aung, Louis B. Cantor, Makoto Aihara

Research output: Review article

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Cystoid macular edema (CME) is a form of macular retina thickening that is characterized by the appearance of cystic fluid-filled intraretinal spaces. It has classically been diagnosed upon investigation after a decrease in visual acuity; however, improvements in imaging technology make it possible to noninvasively detect CME even before a clinically significant decrease in central vision. Risk factors for the development of CME include diabetic retinopathy, retinal vein occlusion, uveitis, and cataract surgery. It has been proposed that eyes with elevated intraocular pressure after cataract surgery, including those treated with prostaglandin analog eye drops, may be at higher risk for the development of CME. We summarize the current knowledge of the molecular mechanisms underlying CME, the potential role of ocular surgery and topical glaucoma medication in increasing the risk of CME, the newly developed imaging methods for diagnosing CME, and the clinical management of CME.

Original languageEnglish
JournalSurvey of ophthalmology
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - jan. 1 2020

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

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