Culture- and PCR-based detection of BV associated microbiological profile of the removed IUDs and correlation with the time period of IUD in place and the presence of the symptoms of genital tract infection

András Ádám, Zoltán Pál, Gabriella Terhes, Márta Szucs, Israel David Gabay, E. Urbán

Research output: Article

Abstract

Objectives: The long-term use of intrauterine devices (IUDs) may lead to biofilm formation on the surface. The aim of this study was to perform the culture- and PCR-based detection of bacteria/fungi from the biofilm of the removed IUDs with different time periods in place. Methods: For a 2-year period, 100 IUD users were involved in the study. In the majority of the cases, IUDs were removed because of the patients' complaints. Beside the aerobic and anaerobic culture, species-specific PCR was carried out to detect Chlamydia trachomatis Neisseria gonorrhoeae and the "signalling" bacteria of bacterial vaginosis (BV) in the biofilm removed by vortexing. Results: Sixty-eight percent of IUDs were used for more than 5 years, 32% were removed after 10 years in place. In 28% of the IUDs ≥ 3 different anaerobic species typically found in BV with or without other aerobic bacteria were found by culture method. Streptococcus agalactiae (14%) and Actinomyces spp. (18%) were also isolated frequently. The PCR detection of Gardnerella vaginalis, Atopobium vaginae, Mobiluncus spp. and Ureaplasma urealyticum were 62%, 32%, 23% and 16%, respectively. Seventy-six percent of the IUDs were PCR positive at least for one "signalling" bacterium of BV. C. trachomatis was detected by PCR only in one IUD together with other aerobic and anaerobic bacteria, while the presence of N. gonorrhoeae could not be confirmed from the biofilm of these removed devices. Conclusion: Sexually transmitted infections (STI)-related bacteria - except for one patient - were not detected on the IUDs removed due to different reasons including clinical symptoms of infection. Presence of any BV "signaling" anaerobic bacteria were detected in a much higher number in the biofilm of the removed IUDs by PCR-based method compared to use culture method (76 versus 28 samples). Different aerobic and anaerobic bacteria colonized an equal number of IUDs, independent of the time-period in place, which may be relevant, if the IUD is removed due to planned pregnancy or due to a fear from upper genital tract infection caused by anaerobic bacteria including Actinomyces spp.

Original languageEnglish
Article number40
JournalAnnals of Clinical Microbiology and Antimicrobials
Volume17
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - nov. 22 2018

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Reproductive Tract Infections
Bacterial Vaginosis
Intrauterine Devices
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Biofilms
Anaerobic Bacteria
Aerobic Bacteria
Bacteria
Actinomyces
Neisseria gonorrhoeae
Chlamydia trachomatis
Mobiluncus
Gardnerella vaginalis
Ureaplasma urealyticum
Streptococcus agalactiae
Family Planning Services
Vagina
Sexually Transmitted Diseases
Fear

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

@article{03a2dfd03a2a466ead7ea661f216e49a,
title = "Culture- and PCR-based detection of BV associated microbiological profile of the removed IUDs and correlation with the time period of IUD in place and the presence of the symptoms of genital tract infection",
abstract = "Objectives: The long-term use of intrauterine devices (IUDs) may lead to biofilm formation on the surface. The aim of this study was to perform the culture- and PCR-based detection of bacteria/fungi from the biofilm of the removed IUDs with different time periods in place. Methods: For a 2-year period, 100 IUD users were involved in the study. In the majority of the cases, IUDs were removed because of the patients' complaints. Beside the aerobic and anaerobic culture, species-specific PCR was carried out to detect Chlamydia trachomatis Neisseria gonorrhoeae and the {"}signalling{"} bacteria of bacterial vaginosis (BV) in the biofilm removed by vortexing. Results: Sixty-eight percent of IUDs were used for more than 5 years, 32{\%} were removed after 10 years in place. In 28{\%} of the IUDs ≥ 3 different anaerobic species typically found in BV with or without other aerobic bacteria were found by culture method. Streptococcus agalactiae (14{\%}) and Actinomyces spp. (18{\%}) were also isolated frequently. The PCR detection of Gardnerella vaginalis, Atopobium vaginae, Mobiluncus spp. and Ureaplasma urealyticum were 62{\%}, 32{\%}, 23{\%} and 16{\%}, respectively. Seventy-six percent of the IUDs were PCR positive at least for one {"}signalling{"} bacterium of BV. C. trachomatis was detected by PCR only in one IUD together with other aerobic and anaerobic bacteria, while the presence of N. gonorrhoeae could not be confirmed from the biofilm of these removed devices. Conclusion: Sexually transmitted infections (STI)-related bacteria - except for one patient - were not detected on the IUDs removed due to different reasons including clinical symptoms of infection. Presence of any BV {"}signaling{"} anaerobic bacteria were detected in a much higher number in the biofilm of the removed IUDs by PCR-based method compared to use culture method (76 versus 28 samples). Different aerobic and anaerobic bacteria colonized an equal number of IUDs, independent of the time-period in place, which may be relevant, if the IUD is removed due to planned pregnancy or due to a fear from upper genital tract infection caused by anaerobic bacteria including Actinomyces spp.",
keywords = "Biofilm, Culture and PCR-based detection of bacteria, IUD, PID, Upper genital tract infection",
author = "Andr{\'a}s {\'A}d{\'a}m and Zolt{\'a}n P{\'a}l and Gabriella Terhes and M{\'a}rta Szucs and Gabay, {Israel David} and E. Urb{\'a}n",
year = "2018",
month = "11",
day = "22",
doi = "10.1186/s12941-018-0293-6",
language = "English",
volume = "17",
journal = "Annals of Clinical Microbiology and Antimicrobials",
issn = "1476-0711",
publisher = "BioMed Central",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Culture- and PCR-based detection of BV associated microbiological profile of the removed IUDs and correlation with the time period of IUD in place and the presence of the symptoms of genital tract infection

AU - Ádám, András

AU - Pál, Zoltán

AU - Terhes, Gabriella

AU - Szucs, Márta

AU - Gabay, Israel David

AU - Urbán, E.

PY - 2018/11/22

Y1 - 2018/11/22

N2 - Objectives: The long-term use of intrauterine devices (IUDs) may lead to biofilm formation on the surface. The aim of this study was to perform the culture- and PCR-based detection of bacteria/fungi from the biofilm of the removed IUDs with different time periods in place. Methods: For a 2-year period, 100 IUD users were involved in the study. In the majority of the cases, IUDs were removed because of the patients' complaints. Beside the aerobic and anaerobic culture, species-specific PCR was carried out to detect Chlamydia trachomatis Neisseria gonorrhoeae and the "signalling" bacteria of bacterial vaginosis (BV) in the biofilm removed by vortexing. Results: Sixty-eight percent of IUDs were used for more than 5 years, 32% were removed after 10 years in place. In 28% of the IUDs ≥ 3 different anaerobic species typically found in BV with or without other aerobic bacteria were found by culture method. Streptococcus agalactiae (14%) and Actinomyces spp. (18%) were also isolated frequently. The PCR detection of Gardnerella vaginalis, Atopobium vaginae, Mobiluncus spp. and Ureaplasma urealyticum were 62%, 32%, 23% and 16%, respectively. Seventy-six percent of the IUDs were PCR positive at least for one "signalling" bacterium of BV. C. trachomatis was detected by PCR only in one IUD together with other aerobic and anaerobic bacteria, while the presence of N. gonorrhoeae could not be confirmed from the biofilm of these removed devices. Conclusion: Sexually transmitted infections (STI)-related bacteria - except for one patient - were not detected on the IUDs removed due to different reasons including clinical symptoms of infection. Presence of any BV "signaling" anaerobic bacteria were detected in a much higher number in the biofilm of the removed IUDs by PCR-based method compared to use culture method (76 versus 28 samples). Different aerobic and anaerobic bacteria colonized an equal number of IUDs, independent of the time-period in place, which may be relevant, if the IUD is removed due to planned pregnancy or due to a fear from upper genital tract infection caused by anaerobic bacteria including Actinomyces spp.

AB - Objectives: The long-term use of intrauterine devices (IUDs) may lead to biofilm formation on the surface. The aim of this study was to perform the culture- and PCR-based detection of bacteria/fungi from the biofilm of the removed IUDs with different time periods in place. Methods: For a 2-year period, 100 IUD users were involved in the study. In the majority of the cases, IUDs were removed because of the patients' complaints. Beside the aerobic and anaerobic culture, species-specific PCR was carried out to detect Chlamydia trachomatis Neisseria gonorrhoeae and the "signalling" bacteria of bacterial vaginosis (BV) in the biofilm removed by vortexing. Results: Sixty-eight percent of IUDs were used for more than 5 years, 32% were removed after 10 years in place. In 28% of the IUDs ≥ 3 different anaerobic species typically found in BV with or without other aerobic bacteria were found by culture method. Streptococcus agalactiae (14%) and Actinomyces spp. (18%) were also isolated frequently. The PCR detection of Gardnerella vaginalis, Atopobium vaginae, Mobiluncus spp. and Ureaplasma urealyticum were 62%, 32%, 23% and 16%, respectively. Seventy-six percent of the IUDs were PCR positive at least for one "signalling" bacterium of BV. C. trachomatis was detected by PCR only in one IUD together with other aerobic and anaerobic bacteria, while the presence of N. gonorrhoeae could not be confirmed from the biofilm of these removed devices. Conclusion: Sexually transmitted infections (STI)-related bacteria - except for one patient - were not detected on the IUDs removed due to different reasons including clinical symptoms of infection. Presence of any BV "signaling" anaerobic bacteria were detected in a much higher number in the biofilm of the removed IUDs by PCR-based method compared to use culture method (76 versus 28 samples). Different aerobic and anaerobic bacteria colonized an equal number of IUDs, independent of the time-period in place, which may be relevant, if the IUD is removed due to planned pregnancy or due to a fear from upper genital tract infection caused by anaerobic bacteria including Actinomyces spp.

KW - Biofilm

KW - Culture and PCR-based detection of bacteria

KW - IUD

KW - PID

KW - Upper genital tract infection

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U2 - 10.1186/s12941-018-0293-6

DO - 10.1186/s12941-018-0293-6

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JO - Annals of Clinical Microbiology and Antimicrobials

JF - Annals of Clinical Microbiology and Antimicrobials

SN - 1476-0711

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