Homoki gyep CO2-kibocsátásának vizsgálata új, nyílt rendszeru automata méroeszközzel

M. Papp, J. Balogh, K. Pintér, S. Fóti, P. Koncz, M. Pavelka, E. Darenova, Z. Nagy

Research output: Article

Abstract

Soil CO2 efflux (Rs) is one of the largest components of the terrestrial carbon balance, so it has a strong influence on the sink/source characteristics of ecosystems. Due to the dynamic diurnal and seasonal changes of Rs it is difficult to describe its annual or daily courses by data from occasional (manual) measurements, while automated systems allow the changes in Rs to be followed quasi-continuously. Continuous measurements also reduce the uncertainties in the response of Rs to abiotic (e.g. temperature, soil water content) and biotic (e.g. biomass, photosynthetic carbon uptake) drivers due to the large number of measurements. Continuous measurements provide data for periods when occasional measurements are usually not performed (e.g. during nights or rainy days). Due to the high variability of Rs during these periods it is crucial to include them in estimating the annual Rs balance. Commercially available automated soil respiration systems have been developed to perform frequent Rs measurements. Their disadvantages include the disturbance of the vegetation (regular removal), the potential failure of the opening-closing systems of the chambers, and the associated high cost. The main advantages of the new, open (steady state), automated soil respiration system (SRS) are the minor disturbances caused to the soil structure and to the spatial structure of the vegetation and the opportunity to perform long-term, unattended measurements of soil CO2 efflux at low cost. The system includes 10 chambers (a number that could be increased), which can be used in various spatial configurations within a 5×5 m quadrate. Moreover, the probability of technical failure is lower than for other continuous systems due to the simple system structure of the chamber design (no moving parts). The chamber system for soil respiration measurement was successfully calibrated against known CO2 effluxes in the laboratory, and proved to perform reliably in the field. When the automatic soil respiration system was tested against a standard soil respiration system (LICOR-6400) in the field for two years, the two systems gave very similar results (no significant discrepancy from a 1:1 line). The SRS served as a reliable tool for the continuous, long-term, unattended automatic measurement of soil CO2 efflux, and allowed the uncertainty of the Rs response to its drivers to be reduced due to a) the large number of measurements, and b) the fact that measurements were made in periods (nights, during rainfall) when measurements are not usually carried out.

Original languageHungarian
Pages (from-to)329-340
Number of pages12
JournalAgrokemia es Talajtan
Volume63
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Fingerprint

soil respiration
calibration
grasslands
grassland
soil
testing
disturbance
vegetation
carbon balance
soil structure
cost
test
uncertainty
soil water
water content
continuous systems
rainfall
carbon
ecosystem
biomass

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agronomy and Crop Science
  • Soil Science

Cite this

Homoki gyep CO2-kibocsátásának vizsgálata új, nyílt rendszeru automata méroeszközzel. / Papp, M.; Balogh, J.; Pintér, K.; Fóti, S.; Koncz, P.; Pavelka, M.; Darenova, E.; Nagy, Z.

In: Agrokemia es Talajtan, Vol. 63, No. 2, 2014, p. 329-340.

Research output: Article

Papp, M, Balogh, J, Pintér, K, Fóti, S, Koncz, P, Pavelka, M, Darenova, E & Nagy, Z 2014, 'Homoki gyep CO2-kibocsátásának vizsgálata új, nyílt rendszeru automata méroeszközzel', Agrokemia es Talajtan, vol. 63, no. 2, pp. 329-340. https://doi.org/10.1556/Agrokem.63.2014.2.11
Papp, M. ; Balogh, J. ; Pintér, K. ; Fóti, S. ; Koncz, P. ; Pavelka, M. ; Darenova, E. ; Nagy, Z. / Homoki gyep CO2-kibocsátásának vizsgálata új, nyílt rendszeru automata méroeszközzel. In: Agrokemia es Talajtan. 2014 ; Vol. 63, No. 2. pp. 329-340.
@article{b93da7b6113f418f9e724670992b1384,
title = "Homoki gyep CO2-kibocs{\'a}t{\'a}s{\'a}nak vizsg{\'a}lata {\'u}j, ny{\'i}lt rendszeru automata m{\'e}roeszk{\"o}zzel",
abstract = "Soil CO2 efflux (Rs) is one of the largest components of the terrestrial carbon balance, so it has a strong influence on the sink/source characteristics of ecosystems. Due to the dynamic diurnal and seasonal changes of Rs it is difficult to describe its annual or daily courses by data from occasional (manual) measurements, while automated systems allow the changes in Rs to be followed quasi-continuously. Continuous measurements also reduce the uncertainties in the response of Rs to abiotic (e.g. temperature, soil water content) and biotic (e.g. biomass, photosynthetic carbon uptake) drivers due to the large number of measurements. Continuous measurements provide data for periods when occasional measurements are usually not performed (e.g. during nights or rainy days). Due to the high variability of Rs during these periods it is crucial to include them in estimating the annual Rs balance. Commercially available automated soil respiration systems have been developed to perform frequent Rs measurements. Their disadvantages include the disturbance of the vegetation (regular removal), the potential failure of the opening-closing systems of the chambers, and the associated high cost. The main advantages of the new, open (steady state), automated soil respiration system (SRS) are the minor disturbances caused to the soil structure and to the spatial structure of the vegetation and the opportunity to perform long-term, unattended measurements of soil CO2 efflux at low cost. The system includes 10 chambers (a number that could be increased), which can be used in various spatial configurations within a 5×5 m quadrate. Moreover, the probability of technical failure is lower than for other continuous systems due to the simple system structure of the chamber design (no moving parts). The chamber system for soil respiration measurement was successfully calibrated against known CO2 effluxes in the laboratory, and proved to perform reliably in the field. When the automatic soil respiration system was tested against a standard soil respiration system (LICOR-6400) in the field for two years, the two systems gave very similar results (no significant discrepancy from a 1:1 line). The SRS served as a reliable tool for the continuous, long-term, unattended automatic measurement of soil CO2 efflux, and allowed the uncertainty of the Rs response to its drivers to be reduced due to a) the large number of measurements, and b) the fact that measurements were made in periods (nights, during rainfall) when measurements are not usually carried out.",
author = "M. Papp and J. Balogh and K. Pint{\'e}r and S. F{\'o}ti and P. Koncz and M. Pavelka and E. Darenova and Z. Nagy",
year = "2014",
doi = "10.1556/Agrokem.63.2014.2.11",
language = "Hungarian",
volume = "63",
pages = "329--340",
journal = "Agrokemia es Talajtan",
issn = "0002-1873",
publisher = "Akademiai Kiado",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Homoki gyep CO2-kibocsátásának vizsgálata új, nyílt rendszeru automata méroeszközzel

AU - Papp, M.

AU - Balogh, J.

AU - Pintér, K.

AU - Fóti, S.

AU - Koncz, P.

AU - Pavelka, M.

AU - Darenova, E.

AU - Nagy, Z.

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - Soil CO2 efflux (Rs) is one of the largest components of the terrestrial carbon balance, so it has a strong influence on the sink/source characteristics of ecosystems. Due to the dynamic diurnal and seasonal changes of Rs it is difficult to describe its annual or daily courses by data from occasional (manual) measurements, while automated systems allow the changes in Rs to be followed quasi-continuously. Continuous measurements also reduce the uncertainties in the response of Rs to abiotic (e.g. temperature, soil water content) and biotic (e.g. biomass, photosynthetic carbon uptake) drivers due to the large number of measurements. Continuous measurements provide data for periods when occasional measurements are usually not performed (e.g. during nights or rainy days). Due to the high variability of Rs during these periods it is crucial to include them in estimating the annual Rs balance. Commercially available automated soil respiration systems have been developed to perform frequent Rs measurements. Their disadvantages include the disturbance of the vegetation (regular removal), the potential failure of the opening-closing systems of the chambers, and the associated high cost. The main advantages of the new, open (steady state), automated soil respiration system (SRS) are the minor disturbances caused to the soil structure and to the spatial structure of the vegetation and the opportunity to perform long-term, unattended measurements of soil CO2 efflux at low cost. The system includes 10 chambers (a number that could be increased), which can be used in various spatial configurations within a 5×5 m quadrate. Moreover, the probability of technical failure is lower than for other continuous systems due to the simple system structure of the chamber design (no moving parts). The chamber system for soil respiration measurement was successfully calibrated against known CO2 effluxes in the laboratory, and proved to perform reliably in the field. When the automatic soil respiration system was tested against a standard soil respiration system (LICOR-6400) in the field for two years, the two systems gave very similar results (no significant discrepancy from a 1:1 line). The SRS served as a reliable tool for the continuous, long-term, unattended automatic measurement of soil CO2 efflux, and allowed the uncertainty of the Rs response to its drivers to be reduced due to a) the large number of measurements, and b) the fact that measurements were made in periods (nights, during rainfall) when measurements are not usually carried out.

AB - Soil CO2 efflux (Rs) is one of the largest components of the terrestrial carbon balance, so it has a strong influence on the sink/source characteristics of ecosystems. Due to the dynamic diurnal and seasonal changes of Rs it is difficult to describe its annual or daily courses by data from occasional (manual) measurements, while automated systems allow the changes in Rs to be followed quasi-continuously. Continuous measurements also reduce the uncertainties in the response of Rs to abiotic (e.g. temperature, soil water content) and biotic (e.g. biomass, photosynthetic carbon uptake) drivers due to the large number of measurements. Continuous measurements provide data for periods when occasional measurements are usually not performed (e.g. during nights or rainy days). Due to the high variability of Rs during these periods it is crucial to include them in estimating the annual Rs balance. Commercially available automated soil respiration systems have been developed to perform frequent Rs measurements. Their disadvantages include the disturbance of the vegetation (regular removal), the potential failure of the opening-closing systems of the chambers, and the associated high cost. The main advantages of the new, open (steady state), automated soil respiration system (SRS) are the minor disturbances caused to the soil structure and to the spatial structure of the vegetation and the opportunity to perform long-term, unattended measurements of soil CO2 efflux at low cost. The system includes 10 chambers (a number that could be increased), which can be used in various spatial configurations within a 5×5 m quadrate. Moreover, the probability of technical failure is lower than for other continuous systems due to the simple system structure of the chamber design (no moving parts). The chamber system for soil respiration measurement was successfully calibrated against known CO2 effluxes in the laboratory, and proved to perform reliably in the field. When the automatic soil respiration system was tested against a standard soil respiration system (LICOR-6400) in the field for two years, the two systems gave very similar results (no significant discrepancy from a 1:1 line). The SRS served as a reliable tool for the continuous, long-term, unattended automatic measurement of soil CO2 efflux, and allowed the uncertainty of the Rs response to its drivers to be reduced due to a) the large number of measurements, and b) the fact that measurements were made in periods (nights, during rainfall) when measurements are not usually carried out.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84988474750&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84988474750&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1556/Agrokem.63.2014.2.11

DO - 10.1556/Agrokem.63.2014.2.11

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84988474750

VL - 63

SP - 329

EP - 340

JO - Agrokemia es Talajtan

JF - Agrokemia es Talajtan

SN - 0002-1873

IS - 2

ER -