Calculation of the BET compatible surface area from any type I isotherms measured below the critical temperature

Research output: Article

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

It may occur in practice that the nitrogen isotherm should be measured at 77 K only in order to determine the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) specific surface area [a(s)(N2, 77)]. This fact has given cause for an elaborate method to calculate the value of a(s)(N2, 77) from Type I isotherms measured on any adsorbents at any temperature. Since Type I isotherms are measured most often in practice the proposed method makes it possible to calculate the value of a(s)(N2, 77) from isotherms of adsorptives which are the actual topics of the investigations. Thus, in these cases the determination of nitrogen isotherms at 77 K can be omitted. The proposed method is based on the Toth (T) equation and on its modified and extended forms. In these equations are present the parameters χ(m), χ(o), and t with the following physical meanings: χ(m) and χ(o) are integral constants originating from the Gibbs equation integrated between definite limits of pressure and coverage and t is a parameter characterizing the heterogeneity of the adsorbents. The parameters χ(m) and χ(o) assure the thermodynamic consistence of these relationships. It is proven that the parameters (χ(m))(1/t) and (χ(o))(1/t) depend only on the structure of adsorbents (micro-, mezoporous, or smooth surfaces). These parameters, calculated from Type I isotherms measured under the critical temperature of the adsorptives, are the bases of the calculation of the BET compatible surface areas.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)402-410
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of colloid and interface science
Volume212
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - ápr. 15 1999

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Biomaterials
  • Surfaces, Coatings and Films
  • Colloid and Surface Chemistry

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