Botanical and geographical characterization of green coffee (Coffea arabica and Coffea canephora): Chemometric evaluation of phenolic and methylxanthine contents

Rosa M. Alonso-Salces, Francesca Serra, Fabiano Remero, K. Heberger

Research output: Article

108 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Green coffee beans of the two main commercial coffee varieties, Coffea arabica (Arabica) and Coffea canephora (Robusta), from the major growing regions of America, Africa, Asia, and Oceania were studied. The contents of chlorogenic acids, cinnamoyl amides, cinnamoyl glycosides, free phenolic acids, and methy!xanthines of green coffee beans were analyzed by liquid chromatography coupled with UV spectrophotometry to determine their botanical and geographical origins. The analysis of caffeic acid, 3-feruloylqulnic acid, 5-feruloylqulnic acid, 4-feruloylqulnic acid, 3,4-dicaffeoylqulnic acid, 3-caffeoyl-5- feruloylquinic acid, 3-caffeoyl-4-feruloylquinic acid, 3-p-coumaroyl-4- caffeoylquinic acid, 3-caffeoyl-4-dimethoxycinnamoylquinic acid, 3-caffeoyl-5-dimethoxycinnamoylquinic acid, p-coumaroyl-W-tryptophan, feruloyl-W-tryptophan, caffeoyl-W-tryptophan, and caffeine enabled the unequivocal botanical characterization of green coffee beans. Moreover, some free phenolic acids and cinnamate conjugates of green coffee beans showed great potential as means for the geographical characterization of coffee. Thus, p-coumaroyl-W-tyrosine, caffeoyl-W-phenylalanine, caffeoyl-W-tyrosine, 3-dimethoxycinnamoyl-5-feruloylquinic acid, and dimethoxyclnnamic acid were found to be characteristic markers for Ugandan Robusta green coffee beans. Multivariate data analysis of the phenolic and methylxanthine profiles provided preliminary results that allowed showing their potential for the determination of the geographical origin of green coffees. Linear discriminant analysis (LDA) and partial least-squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) provided classification models that correctly identified all authentic Robusta green coffee beans from Cameroon and Vietnam and 94% of those from Indonesia. Moreover, PLS-DA afforded independent models for Robusta samples from these three countries with sensitivities and specificities of classifications close to 100% and for Arabica samples from America and Africa with sensitivities of 86 and 70% and specificities to the other class of 90 and 97%, respectively.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4224-4235
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry
Volume57
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - máj. 27 2009

Fingerprint

Coffea
Coffea canephora
Coffee
chemometrics
Coffea arabica
coffee beans
Acids
acids
Discriminant Analysis
Discriminant analysis
Tryptophan
discriminant analysis
tryptophan
Chlorogenic Acid
chlorogenic acid
Least-Squares Analysis
phenolic acids
tyrosine
least squares
xanthines

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Chemistry(all)

Cite this

@article{4b96b5d5afae4ce6b9be92cd5b9884bd,
title = "Botanical and geographical characterization of green coffee (Coffea arabica and Coffea canephora): Chemometric evaluation of phenolic and methylxanthine contents",
abstract = "Green coffee beans of the two main commercial coffee varieties, Coffea arabica (Arabica) and Coffea canephora (Robusta), from the major growing regions of America, Africa, Asia, and Oceania were studied. The contents of chlorogenic acids, cinnamoyl amides, cinnamoyl glycosides, free phenolic acids, and methy!xanthines of green coffee beans were analyzed by liquid chromatography coupled with UV spectrophotometry to determine their botanical and geographical origins. The analysis of caffeic acid, 3-feruloylqulnic acid, 5-feruloylqulnic acid, 4-feruloylqulnic acid, 3,4-dicaffeoylqulnic acid, 3-caffeoyl-5- feruloylquinic acid, 3-caffeoyl-4-feruloylquinic acid, 3-p-coumaroyl-4- caffeoylquinic acid, 3-caffeoyl-4-dimethoxycinnamoylquinic acid, 3-caffeoyl-5-dimethoxycinnamoylquinic acid, p-coumaroyl-W-tryptophan, feruloyl-W-tryptophan, caffeoyl-W-tryptophan, and caffeine enabled the unequivocal botanical characterization of green coffee beans. Moreover, some free phenolic acids and cinnamate conjugates of green coffee beans showed great potential as means for the geographical characterization of coffee. Thus, p-coumaroyl-W-tyrosine, caffeoyl-W-phenylalanine, caffeoyl-W-tyrosine, 3-dimethoxycinnamoyl-5-feruloylquinic acid, and dimethoxyclnnamic acid were found to be characteristic markers for Ugandan Robusta green coffee beans. Multivariate data analysis of the phenolic and methylxanthine profiles provided preliminary results that allowed showing their potential for the determination of the geographical origin of green coffees. Linear discriminant analysis (LDA) and partial least-squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) provided classification models that correctly identified all authentic Robusta green coffee beans from Cameroon and Vietnam and 94{\%} of those from Indonesia. Moreover, PLS-DA afforded independent models for Robusta samples from these three countries with sensitivities and specificities of classifications close to 100{\%} and for Arabica samples from America and Africa with sensitivities of 86 and 70{\%} and specificities to the other class of 90 and 97{\%}, respectively.",
keywords = "Chlorogenic acid, Cinnamoyl amide, Cinnamoyl glycoside, Coffee, Methylxanthine, Pattern recognition",
author = "Alonso-Salces, {Rosa M.} and Francesca Serra and Fabiano Remero and K. Heberger",
year = "2009",
month = "5",
day = "27",
doi = "10.1021/jf8037117",
language = "English",
volume = "57",
pages = "4224--4235",
journal = "Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry",
issn = "0021-8561",
publisher = "American Chemical Society",
number = "10",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Botanical and geographical characterization of green coffee (Coffea arabica and Coffea canephora)

T2 - Chemometric evaluation of phenolic and methylxanthine contents

AU - Alonso-Salces, Rosa M.

AU - Serra, Francesca

AU - Remero, Fabiano

AU - Heberger, K.

PY - 2009/5/27

Y1 - 2009/5/27

N2 - Green coffee beans of the two main commercial coffee varieties, Coffea arabica (Arabica) and Coffea canephora (Robusta), from the major growing regions of America, Africa, Asia, and Oceania were studied. The contents of chlorogenic acids, cinnamoyl amides, cinnamoyl glycosides, free phenolic acids, and methy!xanthines of green coffee beans were analyzed by liquid chromatography coupled with UV spectrophotometry to determine their botanical and geographical origins. The analysis of caffeic acid, 3-feruloylqulnic acid, 5-feruloylqulnic acid, 4-feruloylqulnic acid, 3,4-dicaffeoylqulnic acid, 3-caffeoyl-5- feruloylquinic acid, 3-caffeoyl-4-feruloylquinic acid, 3-p-coumaroyl-4- caffeoylquinic acid, 3-caffeoyl-4-dimethoxycinnamoylquinic acid, 3-caffeoyl-5-dimethoxycinnamoylquinic acid, p-coumaroyl-W-tryptophan, feruloyl-W-tryptophan, caffeoyl-W-tryptophan, and caffeine enabled the unequivocal botanical characterization of green coffee beans. Moreover, some free phenolic acids and cinnamate conjugates of green coffee beans showed great potential as means for the geographical characterization of coffee. Thus, p-coumaroyl-W-tyrosine, caffeoyl-W-phenylalanine, caffeoyl-W-tyrosine, 3-dimethoxycinnamoyl-5-feruloylquinic acid, and dimethoxyclnnamic acid were found to be characteristic markers for Ugandan Robusta green coffee beans. Multivariate data analysis of the phenolic and methylxanthine profiles provided preliminary results that allowed showing their potential for the determination of the geographical origin of green coffees. Linear discriminant analysis (LDA) and partial least-squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) provided classification models that correctly identified all authentic Robusta green coffee beans from Cameroon and Vietnam and 94% of those from Indonesia. Moreover, PLS-DA afforded independent models for Robusta samples from these three countries with sensitivities and specificities of classifications close to 100% and for Arabica samples from America and Africa with sensitivities of 86 and 70% and specificities to the other class of 90 and 97%, respectively.

AB - Green coffee beans of the two main commercial coffee varieties, Coffea arabica (Arabica) and Coffea canephora (Robusta), from the major growing regions of America, Africa, Asia, and Oceania were studied. The contents of chlorogenic acids, cinnamoyl amides, cinnamoyl glycosides, free phenolic acids, and methy!xanthines of green coffee beans were analyzed by liquid chromatography coupled with UV spectrophotometry to determine their botanical and geographical origins. The analysis of caffeic acid, 3-feruloylqulnic acid, 5-feruloylqulnic acid, 4-feruloylqulnic acid, 3,4-dicaffeoylqulnic acid, 3-caffeoyl-5- feruloylquinic acid, 3-caffeoyl-4-feruloylquinic acid, 3-p-coumaroyl-4- caffeoylquinic acid, 3-caffeoyl-4-dimethoxycinnamoylquinic acid, 3-caffeoyl-5-dimethoxycinnamoylquinic acid, p-coumaroyl-W-tryptophan, feruloyl-W-tryptophan, caffeoyl-W-tryptophan, and caffeine enabled the unequivocal botanical characterization of green coffee beans. Moreover, some free phenolic acids and cinnamate conjugates of green coffee beans showed great potential as means for the geographical characterization of coffee. Thus, p-coumaroyl-W-tyrosine, caffeoyl-W-phenylalanine, caffeoyl-W-tyrosine, 3-dimethoxycinnamoyl-5-feruloylquinic acid, and dimethoxyclnnamic acid were found to be characteristic markers for Ugandan Robusta green coffee beans. Multivariate data analysis of the phenolic and methylxanthine profiles provided preliminary results that allowed showing their potential for the determination of the geographical origin of green coffees. Linear discriminant analysis (LDA) and partial least-squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) provided classification models that correctly identified all authentic Robusta green coffee beans from Cameroon and Vietnam and 94% of those from Indonesia. Moreover, PLS-DA afforded independent models for Robusta samples from these three countries with sensitivities and specificities of classifications close to 100% and for Arabica samples from America and Africa with sensitivities of 86 and 70% and specificities to the other class of 90 and 97%, respectively.

KW - Chlorogenic acid

KW - Cinnamoyl amide

KW - Cinnamoyl glycoside

KW - Coffee

KW - Methylxanthine

KW - Pattern recognition

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=66149141716&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=66149141716&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1021/jf8037117

DO - 10.1021/jf8037117

M3 - Article

C2 - 19298065

AN - SCOPUS:66149141716

VL - 57

SP - 4224

EP - 4235

JO - Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry

JF - Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry

SN - 0021-8561

IS - 10

ER -