Associations between season of birth and the risk of lung cancer: Epidemiological findings from Hungary

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4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Both incidence and mortality of lung cancer are especially high in Hungary. Several investigations suggested recently that month of birth (MOB) is associated with the risks of several nonmalignant disorders as well as some malignant disorders. Only a few studies investigated previously the association between MOB and risk of lung cancer, but they provided inconsistent results. We, therefore, decided to investigate this issue in a large sample of individuals who died from lung cancer. Accordingly, we determined the MOB-associated risk of death by lung cancer between the years 1970 and 2009 among all individuals born in Hungary between 1925 and 1934. The final sample included about two million people. A total of 61,904 deaths by lung cancer occurred in this sample during the period investigated. Using analysis of variance (ANOVA), we did not find significant association between MOB and risk of lung cancer death, either in the whole population investigated (F=1.492; p=.145) or in the female subpopulation (F=1.535; p=.129). However, those males born in late spring (MayJune) had a lower risk of lung cancer development (F=2.577; p=.006). Results of the Edwards test also did not suggest consistent association between MOB and risk of lung cancer death in the whole investigated period (19251934) in any populations (i.e., whole population or male and female subpopulations). In conclusion, we did not find significant association between MOB and risk of lung cancer in our total sample (although results alluded to a weak association between MOB and risk of lung cancer development among males). The possible associations between MOB and the risk of lung cancer development (or smoking) would require confirmation (or refutation) in large studies from other populations.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)643-650
Number of pages8
JournalChronobiology International
Volume28
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - aug. 1 2011

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)

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