AnaLogic wave computers - Wave-type algorithms: Canonical description, computer classes, and computational complexity

Research output: Conference contribution

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this, paper we introduce the AnaLogic Wave Computer in an algorithmic way by introducing the α-recursive functions. We show, that elementary waves can be used for practical purposes and describe a new algorithmic thinking, motivated by practical and nature made experience. Next, three types of computational paradigms (Turing Machine on integers, Newton Machine on reals and CNN Universal Machine on flows) and the respective computational complexities are introduced based on practical and physical measures, along with some of their surprising properties.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings - IEEE International Symposium on Circuits and Systems
Pages41-44
Number of pages4
Volume3
Publication statusPublished - 2001
EventIEEE International Symposium on Circuits and Systems (ISCAS 2001) - Sydney, NSW, Australia
Duration: máj. 6 2001máj. 9 2001

Other

OtherIEEE International Symposium on Circuits and Systems (ISCAS 2001)
CountryAustralia
CitySydney, NSW
Period5/6/015/9/01

Fingerprint

Computational complexity
Recursive functions
Turing machines

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Hardware and Architecture

Cite this

Roska, T. (2001). AnaLogic wave computers - Wave-type algorithms: Canonical description, computer classes, and computational complexity. In Proceedings - IEEE International Symposium on Circuits and Systems (Vol. 3, pp. 41-44)

AnaLogic wave computers - Wave-type algorithms : Canonical description, computer classes, and computational complexity. / Roska, T.

Proceedings - IEEE International Symposium on Circuits and Systems. Vol. 3 2001. p. 41-44.

Research output: Conference contribution

Roska, T 2001, AnaLogic wave computers - Wave-type algorithms: Canonical description, computer classes, and computational complexity. in Proceedings - IEEE International Symposium on Circuits and Systems. vol. 3, pp. 41-44, IEEE International Symposium on Circuits and Systems (ISCAS 2001), Sydney, NSW, Australia, 5/6/01.
Roska T. AnaLogic wave computers - Wave-type algorithms: Canonical description, computer classes, and computational complexity. In Proceedings - IEEE International Symposium on Circuits and Systems. Vol. 3. 2001. p. 41-44
Roska, T. / AnaLogic wave computers - Wave-type algorithms : Canonical description, computer classes, and computational complexity. Proceedings - IEEE International Symposium on Circuits and Systems. Vol. 3 2001. pp. 41-44
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