Acute and long-term effects of the 5-HT2 receptor antagonist ritanserin on EEG power spectra, motor activity, and sleep: Changes at the light-dark phase shift

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Abstract

Parallel effects of a single injection of the 5-HT2 receptor antagonist ritanserin on EEG power spectra, sleep and motor activity were measured for a 20-h period in freely moving Sprague-Dawley rats. Ritanserin (0.3 mg/kg, i.p.), administered at light onset (passive phase), caused an immediate transient increase in the EEG power density in the low frequency range (0.25-6 Hz, mainly delta activity) and a depression in the high frequency range (27-30 Hz) accompanied by a decrease in vigilance and light slow wave sleep (SWS-1), intermediate stage of sleep and increase in deep slow wave sleep (SWS-2) compared to control treatment. All these effects were over 8 h after the injection. Twelve hours after the injection, at dark onset (active phase), there was a marked increase in vigilance and motor activity and decrease in SWS-1 and spindle frequency activity in the control animals, but all these changes were diminished by ritanserin treatment. These effects resulted in a significant relative increase in the intermediate band (peak: 12-15 Hz) of the EEG power spectra and thus, a relative increase in thalamo-cortical synchronization caused by ritanserin at dark onset. Because ritanserin is a selective 5-HT2 receptor antagonist, we conclude that under physiological conditions serotonin increases EEG desynchronization and produces an increase in vigilance level and motor activity by tonic activation of 5-HT2 receptors. This regulatory mechanism plays an important role in the waking process, and the appearances of its effects in the light and dark phase are markedly different.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)105-111
Number of pages7
JournalBrain Research
Volume943
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - júl. 5 2002

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Ritanserin
Serotonin 5-HT2 Receptor Antagonists
Electroencephalography
Sleep
Motor Activity
Light
Injections
Cortical Synchronization
Sleep Stages
Sprague Dawley Rats
Serotonin
Depression
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

@article{e56c50a34ff24b409d9248677c0991c4,
title = "Acute and long-term effects of the 5-HT2 receptor antagonist ritanserin on EEG power spectra, motor activity, and sleep: Changes at the light-dark phase shift",
abstract = "Parallel effects of a single injection of the 5-HT2 receptor antagonist ritanserin on EEG power spectra, sleep and motor activity were measured for a 20-h period in freely moving Sprague-Dawley rats. Ritanserin (0.3 mg/kg, i.p.), administered at light onset (passive phase), caused an immediate transient increase in the EEG power density in the low frequency range (0.25-6 Hz, mainly delta activity) and a depression in the high frequency range (27-30 Hz) accompanied by a decrease in vigilance and light slow wave sleep (SWS-1), intermediate stage of sleep and increase in deep slow wave sleep (SWS-2) compared to control treatment. All these effects were over 8 h after the injection. Twelve hours after the injection, at dark onset (active phase), there was a marked increase in vigilance and motor activity and decrease in SWS-1 and spindle frequency activity in the control animals, but all these changes were diminished by ritanserin treatment. These effects resulted in a significant relative increase in the intermediate band (peak: 12-15 Hz) of the EEG power spectra and thus, a relative increase in thalamo-cortical synchronization caused by ritanserin at dark onset. Because ritanserin is a selective 5-HT2 receptor antagonist, we conclude that under physiological conditions serotonin increases EEG desynchronization and produces an increase in vigilance level and motor activity by tonic activation of 5-HT2 receptors. This regulatory mechanism plays an important role in the waking process, and the appearances of its effects in the light and dark phase are markedly different.",
keywords = "5-HT receptor, Circadian rhythm, EEG, Motor activity, Ritanserin, Sleep, Spectral analysis, Thalamo-cortical synchronization",
author = "Sandor Kantor and R. Jakus and R. B{\'o}dizs and P. Hal{\'a}sz and G. Bagdy",
year = "2002",
month = "7",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Acute and long-term effects of the 5-HT2 receptor antagonist ritanserin on EEG power spectra, motor activity, and sleep

T2 - Changes at the light-dark phase shift

AU - Kantor, Sandor

AU - Jakus, R.

AU - Bódizs, R.

AU - Halász, P.

AU - Bagdy, G.

PY - 2002/7/5

Y1 - 2002/7/5

N2 - Parallel effects of a single injection of the 5-HT2 receptor antagonist ritanserin on EEG power spectra, sleep and motor activity were measured for a 20-h period in freely moving Sprague-Dawley rats. Ritanserin (0.3 mg/kg, i.p.), administered at light onset (passive phase), caused an immediate transient increase in the EEG power density in the low frequency range (0.25-6 Hz, mainly delta activity) and a depression in the high frequency range (27-30 Hz) accompanied by a decrease in vigilance and light slow wave sleep (SWS-1), intermediate stage of sleep and increase in deep slow wave sleep (SWS-2) compared to control treatment. All these effects were over 8 h after the injection. Twelve hours after the injection, at dark onset (active phase), there was a marked increase in vigilance and motor activity and decrease in SWS-1 and spindle frequency activity in the control animals, but all these changes were diminished by ritanserin treatment. These effects resulted in a significant relative increase in the intermediate band (peak: 12-15 Hz) of the EEG power spectra and thus, a relative increase in thalamo-cortical synchronization caused by ritanserin at dark onset. Because ritanserin is a selective 5-HT2 receptor antagonist, we conclude that under physiological conditions serotonin increases EEG desynchronization and produces an increase in vigilance level and motor activity by tonic activation of 5-HT2 receptors. This regulatory mechanism plays an important role in the waking process, and the appearances of its effects in the light and dark phase are markedly different.

AB - Parallel effects of a single injection of the 5-HT2 receptor antagonist ritanserin on EEG power spectra, sleep and motor activity were measured for a 20-h period in freely moving Sprague-Dawley rats. Ritanserin (0.3 mg/kg, i.p.), administered at light onset (passive phase), caused an immediate transient increase in the EEG power density in the low frequency range (0.25-6 Hz, mainly delta activity) and a depression in the high frequency range (27-30 Hz) accompanied by a decrease in vigilance and light slow wave sleep (SWS-1), intermediate stage of sleep and increase in deep slow wave sleep (SWS-2) compared to control treatment. All these effects were over 8 h after the injection. Twelve hours after the injection, at dark onset (active phase), there was a marked increase in vigilance and motor activity and decrease in SWS-1 and spindle frequency activity in the control animals, but all these changes were diminished by ritanserin treatment. These effects resulted in a significant relative increase in the intermediate band (peak: 12-15 Hz) of the EEG power spectra and thus, a relative increase in thalamo-cortical synchronization caused by ritanserin at dark onset. Because ritanserin is a selective 5-HT2 receptor antagonist, we conclude that under physiological conditions serotonin increases EEG desynchronization and produces an increase in vigilance level and motor activity by tonic activation of 5-HT2 receptors. This regulatory mechanism plays an important role in the waking process, and the appearances of its effects in the light and dark phase are markedly different.

KW - 5-HT receptor

KW - Circadian rhythm

KW - EEG

KW - Motor activity

KW - Ritanserin

KW - Sleep

KW - Spectral analysis

KW - Thalamo-cortical synchronization

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DO - 10.1016/S0006-8993(02)02698-7

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C2 - 12088844

AN - SCOPUS:0037024948

VL - 943

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EP - 111

JO - Brain Research

JF - Brain Research

SN - 0006-8993

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