Zoonotic transmission of rotavirus: Surveillance and control

Renata Doro, Szilvia L. Farkas, Vito Martella, K. Bányai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Group A rotavirus (Rotavirus A, RVA) is the main cause of acute dehydrating diarrhea in humans and numerous animal species. RVA shows vast diversity and a variety of human strains share genetic and antigenic features with animal origin RVA strains. This finding suggests that interspecies transmission is an important mechanism of rotavirus evolution and contributes to the diversity of human RVA strains. RVA is responsible for half a million deaths and several million hospitalizations worldwide. Globally, two rotavirus vaccines are available for routine use in infants. These vaccines show a great efficacy profile and induce protective immunity against various rotavirus strains. However, little is known about the long-term evolution and epidemiology of RVA strains under selective pressure related to vaccine use. Continuous strain surveillance in the post-vaccine licensure era is needed to help better understand mechanisms that may affect vaccine effectiveness.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1337-1350
Number of pages14
JournalExpert Review of Anti-Infective Therapy
Volume13
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2 2015

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Rotavirus
Zoonoses
Vaccines
Rotavirus Vaccines
Licensure
Diarrhea
Immunity
Epidemiology
Hospitalization

Keywords

  • Evolution
  • interspecies transmission
  • molecular epidemiology
  • reassortment
  • rotavirus A

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Microbiology
  • Virology

Cite this

Zoonotic transmission of rotavirus : Surveillance and control. / Doro, Renata; Farkas, Szilvia L.; Martella, Vito; Bányai, K.

In: Expert Review of Anti-Infective Therapy, Vol. 13, No. 11, 02.11.2015, p. 1337-1350.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Doro, Renata ; Farkas, Szilvia L. ; Martella, Vito ; Bányai, K. / Zoonotic transmission of rotavirus : Surveillance and control. In: Expert Review of Anti-Infective Therapy. 2015 ; Vol. 13, No. 11. pp. 1337-1350.
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