Zoonotic aspects of rotaviruses

V. Martella, K. Bányai, Jelle Matthijnssens, Canio Buonavoglia, Max Ciarlet

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

311 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Rotaviruses are important enteric pathogens of humans and animals. Group A rotaviruses (GARVs) account for up to 1 million children deaths each year, chiefly in developing countries and human vaccines are now available in many countries. Rotavirus-associated enteritis is a major problem in livestock animals, notably in young calves and piglets. Early in the epidemiological GARV studies in humans, either sporadic cases or epidemics by atypical, animal-like GARV strains were described. Complete genome sequencing of human and animal GARV strains has revealed a striking genetic heterogeneity in the 11 double stranded RNA segments across different rotavirus strains and has provided evidence for frequent intersections between the evolution of human and animal rotaviruses, as a result of multiple, repeated events of interspecies transmission and subsequent adaptation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)246-255
Number of pages10
JournalVeterinary Microbiology
Volume140
Issue number3-4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 27 2010

Fingerprint

Rotavirus
Zoonoses
animals
Genetic Heterogeneity
Double-Stranded RNA
Enteritis
double-stranded RNA
young animals
enteritis
Livestock
Human Genome
Developing Countries
piglets
developing countries
Vaccines
livestock
calves
vaccines
death
genome

Keywords

  • Rotaviruses
  • Zoonoses

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology
  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Martella, V., Bányai, K., Matthijnssens, J., Buonavoglia, C., & Ciarlet, M. (2010). Zoonotic aspects of rotaviruses. Veterinary Microbiology, 140(3-4), 246-255. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.vetmic.2009.08.028

Zoonotic aspects of rotaviruses. / Martella, V.; Bányai, K.; Matthijnssens, Jelle; Buonavoglia, Canio; Ciarlet, Max.

In: Veterinary Microbiology, Vol. 140, No. 3-4, 27.01.2010, p. 246-255.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Martella, V, Bányai, K, Matthijnssens, J, Buonavoglia, C & Ciarlet, M 2010, 'Zoonotic aspects of rotaviruses', Veterinary Microbiology, vol. 140, no. 3-4, pp. 246-255. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.vetmic.2009.08.028
Martella V, Bányai K, Matthijnssens J, Buonavoglia C, Ciarlet M. Zoonotic aspects of rotaviruses. Veterinary Microbiology. 2010 Jan 27;140(3-4):246-255. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.vetmic.2009.08.028
Martella, V. ; Bányai, K. ; Matthijnssens, Jelle ; Buonavoglia, Canio ; Ciarlet, Max. / Zoonotic aspects of rotaviruses. In: Veterinary Microbiology. 2010 ; Vol. 140, No. 3-4. pp. 246-255.
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