X-ray holography with atomic resolution

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

244 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

DIFFRACTION methods for cristallographic structure determination suffer from the so-called 'phase problem'; a diffraction pattern provides intensity but not phase information for the scattered beams, and therefore cannot be uniquely inverted to obtain the crystal structure of a sample. Holographic methods1, on the other hand, offer a means of extracting both intensity and phase information. To be useful for cristallographic applications, holography must be implemented with radiation of sufficiently small wavelength to resolve atomic-scale features2. One method, electron-emission holography3-9, uses electron waves and is a powerful tool for studying surface structure; but it cannot image the internal structure of solids because of complications arising from the highly anisotropic nature of electron scattering processes. A proposed alternative method uses X-rays2,10-13, which scatter more isotropically than electrons. Here we demonstrate the efficacy of atomic-scale X-ray holography by obtaining direct images of the three-dimensional arrangement of strontium atoms in the cubic perovskite SrTiO3. With more intense synchrotron sources for illumination, and with the development of improved X-ray detectors, X-ray holography should become a powerful general technique for unambiguous structure determination in condensed matter systems.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)49-51
Number of pages3
JournalNature
Volume380
Issue number6569
Publication statusPublished - Mar 7 1996

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holography
x rays
strontium
electron emission
synchrotrons
electron scattering
electrons
diffraction patterns
illumination
crystal structure
detectors
radiation
wavelengths
atoms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

X-ray holography with atomic resolution. / Tegze, M.; Faigel, G.

In: Nature, Vol. 380, No. 6569, 07.03.1996, p. 49-51.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tegze, M. ; Faigel, G. / X-ray holography with atomic resolution. In: Nature. 1996 ; Vol. 380, No. 6569. pp. 49-51.
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