Miért halnak meg idocombining double acute accent elocombining double acute accenttt a Magyar férfiak?

Translated title of the contribution: Why do Hungarian men die early?

M. Kopp, Skrabski Árpád

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The mortality rate for 40-69 years old men was 12.2 /thousand males of corresponding age in 1960 and 16.2 in 2005: it increased by 33 %, while among 40-69 years old women it decreased from 9.6 0/thousand females of corresponding age to 7.8. The aim of the present follow up study was to analyze which psychosocial risk factors might explain the high premature mortality rates among Hungarian men? Participants in the Hungarostudy 2002 study, a nationally representative sample, 1130 men and 1529 women were contacted again in the follow up study in 2006, who in 2002 were between the age of 40-69 years. By 2006, 99 men (8.8%) and 53 women (3.5 %) died in this age group. Socioeconomic, psychosocial and work related measures, self-rated health, chronic disorders, depressive symptoms (BDI), WHO well-being, negative affect, self-efficacy, meaning in life and health behavioral factors were included in the analysis. After adjustment according to smoking, alcohol abuse, BMI, education and age a number of variables were significant predictors of mortality only in men: low education, low subjective social status, low personal and family income, insecurity of work, no control in work, severe depression, no meaning in life, low social support from spouse, low social support from child. Socioeconomic and work related risk factors predicted only male premature death. Among women dissatisfaction with personal relations was the most important risk factor. Among men depression seems to intermediate between these chronic stress factors and premature death.

Original languageHungarian
Pages (from-to)141-149
Number of pages9
JournalNeuropsychopharmacologia Hungarica
Volume11
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 2009

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Premature Mortality
Depression
Social Support
Mortality
Education
Social Adjustment
Health
Self Efficacy
Spouses
Alcoholism
Age Groups
Smoking
Psychology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics(all)
  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Miért halnak meg idocombining double acute accent elocombining double acute accenttt a Magyar férfiak? / Kopp, M.; Árpád, Skrabski.

In: Neuropsychopharmacologia Hungarica, Vol. 11, No. 3, 2009, p. 141-149.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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