Miért gyakoribb a depresszió migrénesekben? A migrén és a depresszió komorbiditásához járuló faktorok áttekintése

Translated title of the contribution: Why are migraineurs more depressed? A review of the factors contributing to the comorbidity of migraine and depression

Daniel Baksa, X. Gonda, G. Juhász

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The comorbidity of migraine and depression is well-known. Patients with both conditions show stronger headache-related symptoms, a more severe clinical course and higher risk for migraine chronification. Therefore, it’s important to identify factors underlying comorbid migraine and depression. The growing body of literature suggests complex, biopsychosocial mechanisms in the background, including shared genetic risk factors and abnormal brain mechanisms, and also different environmental (stress) and psychological variables (for example: rumination, neuroticism). In this short review we summarize the most important findings regarding the interacting factors in the pathomechanism of the co-existence of migraine and depression. Finally, we conclude some therapeutical considerations regarding treatment of patients with the migraine-depression phenotype.

Original languageHungarian
Pages (from-to)37-44
Number of pages8
JournalNeuropsychopharmacologia Hungarica
Volume19
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2017

Fingerprint

Migraine Disorders
Comorbidity
Depression
Psychological Stress
Headache
Phenotype
Brain
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics(all)
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

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title = "Mi{\'e}rt gyakoribb a depresszi{\'o} migr{\'e}nesekben? A migr{\'e}n {\'e}s a depresszi{\'o} komorbidit{\'a}s{\'a}hoz j{\'a}rul{\'o} faktorok {\'a}ttekint{\'e}se",
abstract = "The comorbidity of migraine and depression is well-known. Patients with both conditions show stronger headache-related symptoms, a more severe clinical course and higher risk for migraine chronification. Therefore, it’s important to identify factors underlying comorbid migraine and depression. The growing body of literature suggests complex, biopsychosocial mechanisms in the background, including shared genetic risk factors and abnormal brain mechanisms, and also different environmental (stress) and psychological variables (for example: rumination, neuroticism). In this short review we summarize the most important findings regarding the interacting factors in the pathomechanism of the co-existence of migraine and depression. Finally, we conclude some therapeutical considerations regarding treatment of patients with the migraine-depression phenotype.",
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T1 - Miért gyakoribb a depresszió migrénesekben? A migrén és a depresszió komorbiditásához járuló faktorok áttekintése

AU - Baksa, Daniel

AU - Gonda, X.

AU - Juhász, G.

PY - 2017/1/1

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N2 - The comorbidity of migraine and depression is well-known. Patients with both conditions show stronger headache-related symptoms, a more severe clinical course and higher risk for migraine chronification. Therefore, it’s important to identify factors underlying comorbid migraine and depression. The growing body of literature suggests complex, biopsychosocial mechanisms in the background, including shared genetic risk factors and abnormal brain mechanisms, and also different environmental (stress) and psychological variables (for example: rumination, neuroticism). In this short review we summarize the most important findings regarding the interacting factors in the pathomechanism of the co-existence of migraine and depression. Finally, we conclude some therapeutical considerations regarding treatment of patients with the migraine-depression phenotype.

AB - The comorbidity of migraine and depression is well-known. Patients with both conditions show stronger headache-related symptoms, a more severe clinical course and higher risk for migraine chronification. Therefore, it’s important to identify factors underlying comorbid migraine and depression. The growing body of literature suggests complex, biopsychosocial mechanisms in the background, including shared genetic risk factors and abnormal brain mechanisms, and also different environmental (stress) and psychological variables (for example: rumination, neuroticism). In this short review we summarize the most important findings regarding the interacting factors in the pathomechanism of the co-existence of migraine and depression. Finally, we conclude some therapeutical considerations regarding treatment of patients with the migraine-depression phenotype.

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KW - Comorbidity

KW - Depression

KW - Genetics

KW - Migraine

KW - Review

KW - Rumination

KW - Stress

KW - Therapy

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