When two and two make four: A structured population without chaos

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Because a large number of theoretical models suggest chaos in populations, field biologists have been trying for decades to confirm the existence of chaos in nature. In spite of their efforts, chaotically evolving populations have been found in extremely low numbers. In this article we consider a metapopulation model which was built up by the interaction of local populations. Local populations interact with their nearest neighbours via migrations, but migration occurs only if the local population density exceeds a threshold level (overcrowding). Depending on the strength of the interaction, the metapopulation density shows noiselike dynamics of many degrees of freedom, periodical evolution, or tends to a fixed point. Low dimensional collective chaos has not been detected. Moreover, the migration size distribution indicates the emergence of self-organized criticality, if the interaction is strong enough.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)89-97
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Theoretical Biology
Volume178
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 7 1996

Fingerprint

Structured Populations
Chaos theory
Chaos
Metapopulation
Migration
Population
Degrees of freedom (mechanics)
Interaction
Population Density
Self-organized Criticality
biologists
population density
Theoretical Models
Theoretical Model
Nearest Neighbor
Exceed
Degree of freedom
Fixed point
Tend

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

When two and two make four : A structured population without chaos. / Scheuring, I.; Jánosi, I.

In: Journal of Theoretical Biology, Vol. 178, No. 1, 07.01.1996, p. 89-97.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{1be53d2270094e7195e42de60a237dd2,
title = "When two and two make four: A structured population without chaos",
abstract = "Because a large number of theoretical models suggest chaos in populations, field biologists have been trying for decades to confirm the existence of chaos in nature. In spite of their efforts, chaotically evolving populations have been found in extremely low numbers. In this article we consider a metapopulation model which was built up by the interaction of local populations. Local populations interact with their nearest neighbours via migrations, but migration occurs only if the local population density exceeds a threshold level (overcrowding). Depending on the strength of the interaction, the metapopulation density shows noiselike dynamics of many degrees of freedom, periodical evolution, or tends to a fixed point. Low dimensional collective chaos has not been detected. Moreover, the migration size distribution indicates the emergence of self-organized criticality, if the interaction is strong enough.",
author = "I. Scheuring and I. J{\'a}nosi",
year = "1996",
month = "1",
day = "7",
doi = "10.1006/jtbi.1996.0008",
language = "English",
volume = "178",
pages = "89--97",
journal = "Journal of Theoretical Biology",
issn = "0022-5193",
publisher = "Academic Press Inc.",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - When two and two make four

T2 - A structured population without chaos

AU - Scheuring, I.

AU - Jánosi, I.

PY - 1996/1/7

Y1 - 1996/1/7

N2 - Because a large number of theoretical models suggest chaos in populations, field biologists have been trying for decades to confirm the existence of chaos in nature. In spite of their efforts, chaotically evolving populations have been found in extremely low numbers. In this article we consider a metapopulation model which was built up by the interaction of local populations. Local populations interact with their nearest neighbours via migrations, but migration occurs only if the local population density exceeds a threshold level (overcrowding). Depending on the strength of the interaction, the metapopulation density shows noiselike dynamics of many degrees of freedom, periodical evolution, or tends to a fixed point. Low dimensional collective chaos has not been detected. Moreover, the migration size distribution indicates the emergence of self-organized criticality, if the interaction is strong enough.

AB - Because a large number of theoretical models suggest chaos in populations, field biologists have been trying for decades to confirm the existence of chaos in nature. In spite of their efforts, chaotically evolving populations have been found in extremely low numbers. In this article we consider a metapopulation model which was built up by the interaction of local populations. Local populations interact with their nearest neighbours via migrations, but migration occurs only if the local population density exceeds a threshold level (overcrowding). Depending on the strength of the interaction, the metapopulation density shows noiselike dynamics of many degrees of freedom, periodical evolution, or tends to a fixed point. Low dimensional collective chaos has not been detected. Moreover, the migration size distribution indicates the emergence of self-organized criticality, if the interaction is strong enough.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0343773458&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0343773458&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1006/jtbi.1996.0008

DO - 10.1006/jtbi.1996.0008

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:0343773458

VL - 178

SP - 89

EP - 97

JO - Journal of Theoretical Biology

JF - Journal of Theoretical Biology

SN - 0022-5193

IS - 1

ER -