Vitamin D deficiency in undifferentiated connective tissue disease

Eva Zold, Peter Szodoray, J. Gaál, J. Kappelmayer, Laszlo Csathy, E. Gyimesi, M. Zeher, G. Szegedi, E. Bodolay

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Introduction: Both experimental and clinical data provide evidence that vitamin D is one of those important environmental factors that can increase the prevalence of certain autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, and inflammatory bowel disease. The aim of the present study was to investigate the prevalence of vitamin D insufficiency in patients with undifferentiated connective tissue disease (UCTD). Methods: Plasma 25(OH)D3 levels in 161 UCTD patients were measured in both summer and winter periods. Autoantibody profiles (antinuclear antibody, anti-U1-ribonucleoprotein, anti-SSA, anti-SSB, anti-Jo1, anti-Scl70, anti-double-stranded DNA, anti-centromere, anti-cardiolipin, rheumatoid factor, and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide) and clinical symptoms of the patients were assessed. Results: Plasma levels of 25(OH)D3 in UCTD patients were significantly lower compared with controls in both summer and winter periods (UCTD summer: 33 ± 13.4 ng/mL versus control: 39.9 ± 11.7 ng/mL, P = 0.01; UCTD winter: 27.8 ± 12.48 ng/mL versus control: 37.8 ± 12.3 ng/mL, P = 0.0001). The presence of dermatological symptoms (photosensitivity, erythema, and chronic discoid rash) and pleuritis was associated with low levels of vitamin D. During the average follow-up period of 2.3 years, 35 out of 161 patients (21.7%) with UCTD further developed into well-established connective tissue disease (CTD). Patients who progressed into CTDs had lower vitamin D levels than those who remained in the UCTD stage (vitamin D levels: CTD: 14.7 ± 6.45 ng/mL versus UCTD: 33.0 ± 13.4 ng/mL, P = 0.0001). Conclusions: In patients with UCTD, a seasonal variance in levels of 25(OH)D3 was identified and showed that these levels were significantly lower than in controls during the corresponding seasons. Our results suggest that vitamin D deficiency in UCTD patients may play a role in the subsequent progression into well-defined CTDs.

Original languageEnglish
Article numberR123
JournalArthritis Research and Therapy
Volume10
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 18 2008

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Vitamin D Deficiency
Connective Tissue Diseases
Vitamin D
Pleurisy
Cardiolipins
Ribonucleoproteins
Centromere
Rheumatoid Factor
Antinuclear Antibodies
Erythema
Exanthema
Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases
Systemic Lupus Erythematosus
Autoantibodies
Autoimmune Diseases
Rheumatoid Arthritis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rheumatology
  • Immunology
  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Vitamin D deficiency in undifferentiated connective tissue disease. / Zold, Eva; Szodoray, Peter; Gaál, J.; Kappelmayer, J.; Csathy, Laszlo; Gyimesi, E.; Zeher, M.; Szegedi, G.; Bodolay, E.

In: Arthritis Research and Therapy, Vol. 10, No. 5, R123, 18.10.2008.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Introduction: Both experimental and clinical data provide evidence that vitamin D is one of those important environmental factors that can increase the prevalence of certain autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, and inflammatory bowel disease. The aim of the present study was to investigate the prevalence of vitamin D insufficiency in patients with undifferentiated connective tissue disease (UCTD). Methods: Plasma 25(OH)D3 levels in 161 UCTD patients were measured in both summer and winter periods. Autoantibody profiles (antinuclear antibody, anti-U1-ribonucleoprotein, anti-SSA, anti-SSB, anti-Jo1, anti-Scl70, anti-double-stranded DNA, anti-centromere, anti-cardiolipin, rheumatoid factor, and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide) and clinical symptoms of the patients were assessed. Results: Plasma levels of 25(OH)D3 in UCTD patients were significantly lower compared with controls in both summer and winter periods (UCTD summer: 33 ± 13.4 ng/mL versus control: 39.9 ± 11.7 ng/mL, P = 0.01; UCTD winter: 27.8 ± 12.48 ng/mL versus control: 37.8 ± 12.3 ng/mL, P = 0.0001). The presence of dermatological symptoms (photosensitivity, erythema, and chronic discoid rash) and pleuritis was associated with low levels of vitamin D. During the average follow-up period of 2.3 years, 35 out of 161 patients (21.7{\%}) with UCTD further developed into well-established connective tissue disease (CTD). Patients who progressed into CTDs had lower vitamin D levels than those who remained in the UCTD stage (vitamin D levels: CTD: 14.7 ± 6.45 ng/mL versus UCTD: 33.0 ± 13.4 ng/mL, P = 0.0001). Conclusions: In patients with UCTD, a seasonal variance in levels of 25(OH)D3 was identified and showed that these levels were significantly lower than in controls during the corresponding seasons. Our results suggest that vitamin D deficiency in UCTD patients may play a role in the subsequent progression into well-defined CTDs.",
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T1 - Vitamin D deficiency in undifferentiated connective tissue disease

AU - Zold, Eva

AU - Szodoray, Peter

AU - Gaál, J.

AU - Kappelmayer, J.

AU - Csathy, Laszlo

AU - Gyimesi, E.

AU - Zeher, M.

AU - Szegedi, G.

AU - Bodolay, E.

PY - 2008/10/18

Y1 - 2008/10/18

N2 - Introduction: Both experimental and clinical data provide evidence that vitamin D is one of those important environmental factors that can increase the prevalence of certain autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, and inflammatory bowel disease. The aim of the present study was to investigate the prevalence of vitamin D insufficiency in patients with undifferentiated connective tissue disease (UCTD). Methods: Plasma 25(OH)D3 levels in 161 UCTD patients were measured in both summer and winter periods. Autoantibody profiles (antinuclear antibody, anti-U1-ribonucleoprotein, anti-SSA, anti-SSB, anti-Jo1, anti-Scl70, anti-double-stranded DNA, anti-centromere, anti-cardiolipin, rheumatoid factor, and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide) and clinical symptoms of the patients were assessed. Results: Plasma levels of 25(OH)D3 in UCTD patients were significantly lower compared with controls in both summer and winter periods (UCTD summer: 33 ± 13.4 ng/mL versus control: 39.9 ± 11.7 ng/mL, P = 0.01; UCTD winter: 27.8 ± 12.48 ng/mL versus control: 37.8 ± 12.3 ng/mL, P = 0.0001). The presence of dermatological symptoms (photosensitivity, erythema, and chronic discoid rash) and pleuritis was associated with low levels of vitamin D. During the average follow-up period of 2.3 years, 35 out of 161 patients (21.7%) with UCTD further developed into well-established connective tissue disease (CTD). Patients who progressed into CTDs had lower vitamin D levels than those who remained in the UCTD stage (vitamin D levels: CTD: 14.7 ± 6.45 ng/mL versus UCTD: 33.0 ± 13.4 ng/mL, P = 0.0001). Conclusions: In patients with UCTD, a seasonal variance in levels of 25(OH)D3 was identified and showed that these levels were significantly lower than in controls during the corresponding seasons. Our results suggest that vitamin D deficiency in UCTD patients may play a role in the subsequent progression into well-defined CTDs.

AB - Introduction: Both experimental and clinical data provide evidence that vitamin D is one of those important environmental factors that can increase the prevalence of certain autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, and inflammatory bowel disease. The aim of the present study was to investigate the prevalence of vitamin D insufficiency in patients with undifferentiated connective tissue disease (UCTD). Methods: Plasma 25(OH)D3 levels in 161 UCTD patients were measured in both summer and winter periods. Autoantibody profiles (antinuclear antibody, anti-U1-ribonucleoprotein, anti-SSA, anti-SSB, anti-Jo1, anti-Scl70, anti-double-stranded DNA, anti-centromere, anti-cardiolipin, rheumatoid factor, and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide) and clinical symptoms of the patients were assessed. Results: Plasma levels of 25(OH)D3 in UCTD patients were significantly lower compared with controls in both summer and winter periods (UCTD summer: 33 ± 13.4 ng/mL versus control: 39.9 ± 11.7 ng/mL, P = 0.01; UCTD winter: 27.8 ± 12.48 ng/mL versus control: 37.8 ± 12.3 ng/mL, P = 0.0001). The presence of dermatological symptoms (photosensitivity, erythema, and chronic discoid rash) and pleuritis was associated with low levels of vitamin D. During the average follow-up period of 2.3 years, 35 out of 161 patients (21.7%) with UCTD further developed into well-established connective tissue disease (CTD). Patients who progressed into CTDs had lower vitamin D levels than those who remained in the UCTD stage (vitamin D levels: CTD: 14.7 ± 6.45 ng/mL versus UCTD: 33.0 ± 13.4 ng/mL, P = 0.0001). Conclusions: In patients with UCTD, a seasonal variance in levels of 25(OH)D3 was identified and showed that these levels were significantly lower than in controls during the corresponding seasons. Our results suggest that vitamin D deficiency in UCTD patients may play a role in the subsequent progression into well-defined CTDs.

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