Visualization of an unstable coiled coil from the scallop myosin rod

Yu Li, Jerry H. Brown, Ludmilla Reshetnikova, Antal Blazsek, László Farkas, L. Nyitray, Carolyn Cohen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

72 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

α-Helical coiled coils in muscle exemplify simplicity and economy of protein design: small variations in sequence lead to remarkable diversity in cellular functions. Myosin II is the key protein in muscle contraction, and the molecule's two-chain α-helical coiled-coil rod region - towards the carboxy terminus of the heavy chain - has unusual structural and dynamic features. The amino-terminal subfragment-2 (S2) domains of the rods can swing out from the thick filament backbone at a hinge in the coiled coil, allowing the two myosin 'heads' and their motor domains to interact with actin and generate tension. Most of the S2 rod appears to be a flexible coiled coil, but studies suggest that the structure at the N-terminal region is unstable, and unwinding or bending of the α-helices near the head-rod junction seems necessary for many of myosin's functional properties. Here we show the physical basis of a particularly weak coiled-coil segment by determining the 2.5-Å-resolution crystal structure of a leucine-zipper-stabilized fragment of the scallop striated-muscle myosin rod adjacent to the head-rod junction. The N-terminal 14 residues are poorly ordered; the rest of the S2 segment forms a flexible coiled coil with poorly packed core residues. The unusual absence of interhelical salt bridges here exposes apolar core atoms to solvent.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)341-345
Number of pages5
JournalNature
Volume424
Issue number6946
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 17 2003

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Pectinidae
Myosin Subfragments
Head
Myosins
Myosin Type II
Leucine Zippers
Striated Muscle
Muscle Contraction
Actins
Proteins
Salts
Muscles

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Li, Y., Brown, J. H., Reshetnikova, L., Blazsek, A., Farkas, L., Nyitray, L., & Cohen, C. (2003). Visualization of an unstable coiled coil from the scallop myosin rod. Nature, 424(6946), 341-345. https://doi.org/10.1038/nature01801

Visualization of an unstable coiled coil from the scallop myosin rod. / Li, Yu; Brown, Jerry H.; Reshetnikova, Ludmilla; Blazsek, Antal; Farkas, László; Nyitray, L.; Cohen, Carolyn.

In: Nature, Vol. 424, No. 6946, 17.07.2003, p. 341-345.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Li, Y, Brown, JH, Reshetnikova, L, Blazsek, A, Farkas, L, Nyitray, L & Cohen, C 2003, 'Visualization of an unstable coiled coil from the scallop myosin rod', Nature, vol. 424, no. 6946, pp. 341-345. https://doi.org/10.1038/nature01801
Li Y, Brown JH, Reshetnikova L, Blazsek A, Farkas L, Nyitray L et al. Visualization of an unstable coiled coil from the scallop myosin rod. Nature. 2003 Jul 17;424(6946):341-345. https://doi.org/10.1038/nature01801
Li, Yu ; Brown, Jerry H. ; Reshetnikova, Ludmilla ; Blazsek, Antal ; Farkas, László ; Nyitray, L. ; Cohen, Carolyn. / Visualization of an unstable coiled coil from the scallop myosin rod. In: Nature. 2003 ; Vol. 424, No. 6946. pp. 341-345.
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