Visual mismatch negativity to disappearing parts of objects and textures

I. Czigler, István Sulykos, Domonkos File, Petia Kojouharova, Zsófia Anna Gaál

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Visual mismatch negativity (vMMN), an event-related signature of automatic detection of events violating sequential regularities is traditionally investigated at the onset of frequent (standard) and rare (deviant) events. In a previous study we obtained vMMN to vanishing parts of continuously presented objects (diamonds with diagonals), and we concluded that the offset-related vMMN is a model of sensitivity to irregular partial occlusion of objects. In the present study we replicated the previous results, but in order to test the object-related interpretation we applied a new condition with a set of separate visual stimuli: a texture of bars with two orientations. In the texture condition (offset of bars with irregular vs. regular orientation) we obtained vMMN, showing that the continuous presence of objects is unnecessary for offset-related vMMN. However, unlike in the object-related condition, reappearance of the previously vanishing lines also elicited vMMN. In principle reappearance of the stimuli is an event with probability 1.0, and according to our results, the object condition reappearance was an expected event. However, the offset and onset of texture elements seems to be treated separately by the system underlying vMMN. As an advantage of the present method, the whole stimulus set during the inter-stimulus interval saturates the visual structures sensitive to stimulus input. Accordingly, the offset-related vMMN is less sensitive to low-level adaptation that differs between the deviant and standard stimuli.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0209130
JournalPLoS ONE
Volume14
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 1 2019

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Textures
texture
Diamond
automatic detection
testing
methodology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Visual mismatch negativity to disappearing parts of objects and textures. / Czigler, I.; Sulykos, István; File, Domonkos; Kojouharova, Petia; Gaál, Zsófia Anna.

In: PLoS ONE, Vol. 14, No. 2, e0209130, 01.02.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Czigler, I. ; Sulykos, István ; File, Domonkos ; Kojouharova, Petia ; Gaál, Zsófia Anna. / Visual mismatch negativity to disappearing parts of objects and textures. In: PLoS ONE. 2019 ; Vol. 14, No. 2.
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