Visual exploration of form and position with identical stimuli

Functional anatomy with PET

Z. Vidnyánszky, Balázs Gulyás, Per E. Roland

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Visual form and position perception in primates is thought to engage two different sets of cortical visual areas. However, the original concept of two functionally different and anatomically segregated pathways has been challenged by recent investigations. Using identical stimuli in the centre of the visual field with no external cues, we examined whether discrimination of form aspects and position aspects would indeed activate occipito-temporal and occipito-parietal areas, respectively. We measured and localised regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) changes in the brain with positron emission tomography (PET) and 15O-butanol while the subjects performed four visual tasks: position discrimination (PD), form discrimination (FD), joint form and position discrimination (FPD), and a control task. Discrimination of form contrasted with discrimination of position resulted in rCBF increases in the lateral occipital and fusiform gyri. Discrimination of position contrasted with discrimination of form yielded rCBF increases in the left frontal eye field and middle frontal gyrus. No extra activations were seen when the joint form and position discrimination task was contrasted with either the individual form and position discrimination tasks. When the individual form and position discrimination tasks were contrasted with the control task, form discrimination resulted in activations in both occipito-temporal and occipito-parietal visual cortical regions, as well as in the right middle-frontal gyrus. Position discrimination resulted in activation in occipito-parietal visual cortical regions, the left frontal eye field and the left middle frontal gyrus. These findings are consistent with the view that the processing of visual position information activates occipito-parietal visual regions. On the other hand, the processing of 2D visual form information, in addition to the activation of occipito-temporal neuronal populations, also involves the parietal cortex. Form and position discrimination activated different nonsymmetrical prefrontal fields. Although the visual stimuli were identical, the network of activated cortical fields depended on whether the task was a form discrimination task or a position discrimination task, indicating a strong task dependence of cortical networks underlying form and position discrimination in the human brain. In contrast to former studies, however, these task-dependent macronetworks are overlapping in the posterior parietal cortex, but differentially engage the occipito-temporal and the prefrontal cortex. (C) Wiley-Liss, Inc.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)104-116
Number of pages13
JournalHuman Brain Mapping
Volume11
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2000

Fingerprint

Positron-Emission Tomography
Anatomy
Cerebrovascular Circulation
Parietal Lobe
Regional Blood Flow
Frontal Lobe
Temporal Lobe
Discrimination (Psychology)
Joints
Form Perception
Occipital Lobe
Butanols
Visual Perception
Brain
Prefrontal Cortex
Visual Fields
Primates
Cues

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology

Cite this

Visual exploration of form and position with identical stimuli : Functional anatomy with PET. / Vidnyánszky, Z.; Gulyás, Balázs; Roland, Per E.

In: Human Brain Mapping, Vol. 11, No. 2, 10.2000, p. 104-116.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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