Vestibular control of intermediate- and long-term cardiovascular responses to experimental orthostasis

G. Raffai, C. Cseko, G. Nádasy, E. Monos

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Sustained orthostasis elicits the elevation of arterial blood pressure (BP) via sympathetic activation in conscious Wistar rats for at least 2 hours. We tested the hypothesis whether vestibular apparatus plays a role in BP and heart rate (HR) control in response to prolonged gravitational stress. BP and HR responses to 45° head-up for either 2 or 24 hours were monitored by telemetry. Vestibular lesions (VL) were performed by a modified microsurgical-chemical technique. Horizontal BP and HR were not influenced by VL preceding 2-hour tilt. VL abolished the sustained 2-hour BP response to head-up tilt (8.3±0.9 mm Hg relative to horizontal values) while suppressed HR transiently only. VL eliminated diurnal BP fluctuations and decreased HR in horizontal position for 24 hours. Head-up tilt for 24 hours increased BP and HR progressively in intact animals, raising their daily average value by 5.6±0.7 mm Hg and 22.2±6 BPM, respectively. VL resulted in an initial BP rise followed by progressive BP reduction in response to long-term head-up tilt (4±2.2 mm Hg) without eliminating the tachycardia (34.4±5.4 BPM). Thus, blockade of labyrinthine inputs attenuates the BP responses elicited by both intermediate and long-term gravitational stress of orthostatic type. However, other sensory inputs derived from non-vestibular cues (e.g. proprioceptive, visual, visceral, cutaneous etc.) seem to be effective enough to maintain BP normal.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)43-51
Number of pages9
JournalPhysiological Research
Volume59
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 2010

Fingerprint

Dizziness
Blood Pressure
Heart Rate
Head
Labyrinth Vestibule
Telemetry
Tachycardia
Cues
Wistar Rats
Arterial Pressure
Skin

Keywords

  • Arterial blood pressure
  • Cardiovascular control
  • Heart rate
  • Orthostasis
  • Vestibular lesion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology

Cite this

Vestibular control of intermediate- and long-term cardiovascular responses to experimental orthostasis. / Raffai, G.; Cseko, C.; Nádasy, G.; Monos, E.

In: Physiological Research, Vol. 59, No. 1, 2010, p. 43-51.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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