Vero/Shiga-toxint termelo Escherichia coli okozta fertozések háziállatokban

Translated title of the contribution: Vero/shiga-toxin producing Escherichia Coli infections in animals

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

A review of Vero-toxin (VT) and "Shiga-like" toxin (SLT) producing Escberichia coli (VTEC and SLTEC respectively) induced infections in animals is given: from the nomenclature to molecular pathogenesis and to special characteristics of toxin groups. As the toxins of these groups are generally characterized by the same or similar structure and pathomechanisms as the toxin of Shigella dysenteriae (composed of one A and five B subunits), it is suggested that in the Hungarian literature the toxins should be labelled as Stx and the toxin producing E. coli bacteria be designated as STEC. These toxins produce systematic and enteric disease in man (Stxl, Stx2), practically only enteric disesase (or mostly carrier state) in bovine and in other ruminants (Stxl, Stx2), and only systemic disease in pigs (Stx2v). The pathomechanism of these toxins is characterized by the receptor mediated endocytosis (Fig.1), followed by fusion with lysosmes and release of the enzymatically active fragment A1, leading to inhibition of protein synthesis and cell death. Most of the STEC bacteria of ruminants and men produce the characteristic "attachment effacement" (AE) lesion accompanied by microvillus degeneration and bacterial adhesion (Fig.2), and formation of cups and pedestals of the intestinal epithelial cell membranes at the site of attachment. The mediator of attachement is a bacterial outer membrane protein (intimin). In contrast, no intestinal cytoskeletal rearrangement or lesion is induced by porcine STEC (Fig.3): bacteria of the oedema disease producing E. coli adhere to the intact microvilli of the small intestinal epithelial cells. This adhesion is similar to that of enterotoxic E. coli (ETEC) and mediated by morphologically and antigenically related fimbriae (Fig.4) called F18ab and F18ac respectively. Members of this large group of STEC bacteria (primarily E. coli strains of serotype O157:H7) are able to induce zoonoses (infections from animals to men). Porcine oedema inducing STEC strain provide an exception as there is no evidence for such strains to colonize man.

Original languageHungarian
Pages (from-to)673-681
Number of pages9
JournalMagyar Allatorvosok Lapja
Volume120
Issue number11
Publication statusPublished - 1998

Fingerprint

Shiga-Toxigenic Escherichia coli
Escherichia coli Infections
Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli
toxins
infection
Shiga Toxins
Escherichia coli
Bacteria
animals
Swine
Ruminants
Microvilli
bacteria
microvilli
Edema
Bacterial Outer Membrane Proteins
lesions (animal)
edema
Epithelial Cells
ruminants

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Vero/Shiga-toxint termelo Escherichia coli okozta fertozések háziállatokban. / Nagy, B.; Tóth, I.

In: Magyar Allatorvosok Lapja, Vol. 120, No. 11, 1998, p. 673-681.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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