Velocity estimation from crustal reflection seismic data.

Z. Hajnal, I. T. Sereda

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The application of velocity spectral analysis to deep crustal reflection data is hindered by the low signal to noise ratio, low frequency, and complex reflection characteristics of the signal. Synthetic and expanding-spread data reveal that when the data is subjected to special processing in the form of common offset velocity filtering, velocity spectral analysis provides useful results. The derived stacking velocity function is convertible to meaningful interval velocity information. A first order error equation has been developed to estimate the maximum uncertainly in the converted velocity data. Numerical experiments indicate that the uncertainty in the calculated interval velocity increases with depth and is inverseley proportional to layer thickness.-Authors

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)261-277
Number of pages17
JournalBollettino di Geofisica Teorica ed Applicata
Volume23
Issue number90-91
Publication statusPublished - 1981

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seismic data
spectral analysis
spectrum analysis
intervals
stacking
signal-to-noise ratio
signal to noise ratios
low frequencies
estimates
experiment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)
  • Environmental Science(all)

Cite this

Velocity estimation from crustal reflection seismic data. / Hajnal, Z.; Sereda, I. T.

In: Bollettino di Geofisica Teorica ed Applicata, Vol. 23, No. 90-91, 1981, p. 261-277.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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