Value-based genomic screening: Exploring genomic screening for chronic diseases using triple value principles

Viktor Dombrádi, Erica Pitini, Carla G. Van El, Anant Jani, Martina Cornel, Paolo Villari, Muir Gray, Klára Bíró

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Background: Genomic screening has unique challenges which makes it difficult to easily implement on a wide scale. If the costs, benefits and tradeoffs of investing in genomic screening are not evaluated properly, there is a risk of wasting finite healthcare resources and also causing avoidable harm. Main text: If healthcare professionals - including policy makers, payers and providers - wish to incorporate genomic screening into healthcare while minimizing waste, maximizing benefits, and considering results that matter to patients, using the principles of triple value (allocative, technical, and personal value) could help them to evaluate tough decisions and tradeoffs. Allocative value focuses on the optimal distribution of limited healthcare resources to maximize the health benefits to the entire population while also accounting for all the costs of care delivery. Technical value ensures that for any given condition, the right intervention is chosen and delivered in the right way. Various methods (e.g. ACCE, HTA, and Wilson and Jungner screening criteria) exist that can help identify appropriate genomic applications. Personal value incorporates preference based informed decision making to ensure that patients are informed about the benefits and harms of the choices available to them and to ensure they make choices based on their values and preferences. Conclusions: Using triple value principles can help healthcare professionals make reasoned and tough judgements about benefits and tradeoffs when they are exploring the role genomic screening for chronic diseases could play in improving the health of their patients and populations.

Original languageEnglish
Article number823
JournalBMC Health Services Research
Volume19
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 11 2019

Fingerprint

Chronic Disease
Delivery of Health Care
Insurance Benefits
Administrative Personnel
Population
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Decision Making
Costs and Cost Analysis
Health

Keywords

  • Chronic disease
  • Genomics
  • Prevention
  • Screening
  • Value-based healthcare

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy

Cite this

Value-based genomic screening : Exploring genomic screening for chronic diseases using triple value principles. / Dombrádi, Viktor; Pitini, Erica; Van El, Carla G.; Jani, Anant; Cornel, Martina; Villari, Paolo; Gray, Muir; Bíró, Klára.

In: BMC Health Services Research, Vol. 19, No. 1, 823, 11.11.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Dombrádi, Viktor ; Pitini, Erica ; Van El, Carla G. ; Jani, Anant ; Cornel, Martina ; Villari, Paolo ; Gray, Muir ; Bíró, Klára. / Value-based genomic screening : Exploring genomic screening for chronic diseases using triple value principles. In: BMC Health Services Research. 2019 ; Vol. 19, No. 1.
@article{eedfb3c0906446ad939ecb55ed7d4a85,
title = "Value-based genomic screening: Exploring genomic screening for chronic diseases using triple value principles",
abstract = "Background: Genomic screening has unique challenges which makes it difficult to easily implement on a wide scale. If the costs, benefits and tradeoffs of investing in genomic screening are not evaluated properly, there is a risk of wasting finite healthcare resources and also causing avoidable harm. Main text: If healthcare professionals - including policy makers, payers and providers - wish to incorporate genomic screening into healthcare while minimizing waste, maximizing benefits, and considering results that matter to patients, using the principles of triple value (allocative, technical, and personal value) could help them to evaluate tough decisions and tradeoffs. Allocative value focuses on the optimal distribution of limited healthcare resources to maximize the health benefits to the entire population while also accounting for all the costs of care delivery. Technical value ensures that for any given condition, the right intervention is chosen and delivered in the right way. Various methods (e.g. ACCE, HTA, and Wilson and Jungner screening criteria) exist that can help identify appropriate genomic applications. Personal value incorporates preference based informed decision making to ensure that patients are informed about the benefits and harms of the choices available to them and to ensure they make choices based on their values and preferences. Conclusions: Using triple value principles can help healthcare professionals make reasoned and tough judgements about benefits and tradeoffs when they are exploring the role genomic screening for chronic diseases could play in improving the health of their patients and populations.",
keywords = "Chronic disease, Genomics, Prevention, Screening, Value-based healthcare",
author = "Viktor Dombr{\'a}di and Erica Pitini and {Van El}, {Carla G.} and Anant Jani and Martina Cornel and Paolo Villari and Muir Gray and Kl{\'a}ra B{\'i}r{\'o}",
year = "2019",
month = "11",
day = "11",
doi = "10.1186/s12913-019-4703-z",
language = "English",
volume = "19",
journal = "BMC Health Services Research",
issn = "1472-6963",
publisher = "BioMed Central",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Value-based genomic screening

T2 - Exploring genomic screening for chronic diseases using triple value principles

AU - Dombrádi, Viktor

AU - Pitini, Erica

AU - Van El, Carla G.

AU - Jani, Anant

AU - Cornel, Martina

AU - Villari, Paolo

AU - Gray, Muir

AU - Bíró, Klára

PY - 2019/11/11

Y1 - 2019/11/11

N2 - Background: Genomic screening has unique challenges which makes it difficult to easily implement on a wide scale. If the costs, benefits and tradeoffs of investing in genomic screening are not evaluated properly, there is a risk of wasting finite healthcare resources and also causing avoidable harm. Main text: If healthcare professionals - including policy makers, payers and providers - wish to incorporate genomic screening into healthcare while minimizing waste, maximizing benefits, and considering results that matter to patients, using the principles of triple value (allocative, technical, and personal value) could help them to evaluate tough decisions and tradeoffs. Allocative value focuses on the optimal distribution of limited healthcare resources to maximize the health benefits to the entire population while also accounting for all the costs of care delivery. Technical value ensures that for any given condition, the right intervention is chosen and delivered in the right way. Various methods (e.g. ACCE, HTA, and Wilson and Jungner screening criteria) exist that can help identify appropriate genomic applications. Personal value incorporates preference based informed decision making to ensure that patients are informed about the benefits and harms of the choices available to them and to ensure they make choices based on their values and preferences. Conclusions: Using triple value principles can help healthcare professionals make reasoned and tough judgements about benefits and tradeoffs when they are exploring the role genomic screening for chronic diseases could play in improving the health of their patients and populations.

AB - Background: Genomic screening has unique challenges which makes it difficult to easily implement on a wide scale. If the costs, benefits and tradeoffs of investing in genomic screening are not evaluated properly, there is a risk of wasting finite healthcare resources and also causing avoidable harm. Main text: If healthcare professionals - including policy makers, payers and providers - wish to incorporate genomic screening into healthcare while minimizing waste, maximizing benefits, and considering results that matter to patients, using the principles of triple value (allocative, technical, and personal value) could help them to evaluate tough decisions and tradeoffs. Allocative value focuses on the optimal distribution of limited healthcare resources to maximize the health benefits to the entire population while also accounting for all the costs of care delivery. Technical value ensures that for any given condition, the right intervention is chosen and delivered in the right way. Various methods (e.g. ACCE, HTA, and Wilson and Jungner screening criteria) exist that can help identify appropriate genomic applications. Personal value incorporates preference based informed decision making to ensure that patients are informed about the benefits and harms of the choices available to them and to ensure they make choices based on their values and preferences. Conclusions: Using triple value principles can help healthcare professionals make reasoned and tough judgements about benefits and tradeoffs when they are exploring the role genomic screening for chronic diseases could play in improving the health of their patients and populations.

KW - Chronic disease

KW - Genomics

KW - Prevention

KW - Screening

KW - Value-based healthcare

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85074832474&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85074832474&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1186/s12913-019-4703-z

DO - 10.1186/s12913-019-4703-z

M3 - Review article

C2 - 31711483

AN - SCOPUS:85074832474

VL - 19

JO - BMC Health Services Research

JF - BMC Health Services Research

SN - 1472-6963

IS - 1

M1 - 823

ER -